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On Track

 

OnTrack: The Newsletter of the International Fission-Track Community

January 1999, Volume 8, Number 2, Issue 17

orange divider image

 

Editor: Alexander Grist

Fission Track Research Laboratory,

Department of Earth Sciences,

Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 3J5

(agrist@is.dal.ca)

In this Issue:

Editor's Notes 2

Short Tracks: News 2

Special Announcement: GEOCANADA 2000 by Lisel Currie 3

Special Announcement : Year 2000 Fission Track Conference by Barry Kohn 4

I’ve lost my apatite by Sandy Grist 5

Swiss Tracks by Diane Seward and Richard Spikings 7

A letter to the editor by Jiri Filip 9

Recent Fission-Track Papers 10

A list of recent fission-track papers by Osamu Himeno 10

1998 Directory of the International Fission-Track Community 13

It’s a small world AFTA all! 23

One copy per lab; please copy and distribute

On Track is a biannual newsletter of the inter-national fission-track community. It is (usually) printed in the months of May and November. The views expressed in On Track are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the fission-track community or the editor(s) of On Track.

Copyrights of by-lined articles belong to the authors and they may not be reproduced without written permission from the authors. Trademarks and patents are the sole property of the corporation(s) and/or individual(s) indicated in the article.

On Track will remain free, at least for the near future. However, to save costs we generally mail only one copy per lab so please be sure to pass On Track around your lab.

Printing and mailing costs for this issue of On Track were paid for by paid advertisements. Standard prices for full, half, and quarter page advertisements are US$ 200, US$ 100 and US$ 50, respectively. There is no charge for "short" ads by non-commercial entities (e.g., universities). Send inquiries concerning On Track to the editor.

PREVIOUS EDITORS:

Dave Coyle (1990-91), La Trobe University

Trevor Dumitru (1991-92), Stanford University

Rasoul Sorkhabi (1992-93)Arizona State University

Dennis Arne (1993-94) Dalhousie University

Richard J. Weiland (1994-95) U of Texas, Austin

Ruth Siddall (1995-96) University College London

Danny Stockli (1996-97) Stanford University

Paul O'Sullivan (1997-98) La Trobe University

CURRENT EDITOR:

Alexander Grist

Department of Earth Sciences

Dalhousie Universtiy

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Canada B3H 3J5

Tel. (902) 494-2372

Fax. (902) 494-6889

E-mail: agrist@is.dal.ca


Editor’s Notes

I would first like to extend my thanks to the previous editor of On Track, Paul O’Sullivan. Without his help, as well as that from another previous editor Trevor Dumitru, the transition in editorship over the last few months would have been much more difficult than it was. On Track is beginning its ninth year of publication, and has evolved and grown significantly during those years, reflecting the ongoing need and importance of such a newsletter designed for fission trackers!

In this issue of On Track: Diane Seward and Richard Spikings write to tell about old and new mountains, labs, on other interests of the Swiss FT group at ETH in Zurich. There is a special announcement (and a mini poster insert) provided by Barry Kohn on the FT Y2K conference at Lorne, Victoria, Australia (having spent too many Februarys in the snow in Halifax, I am now making my travel plans). Lisel Currie (who is soon to be a mom!) also has an announcement for us (but its not about that, its about a special FT session, to be held during the GEOCANADA 2000 meeting in Calgary, Alberta, Canada). Jari Filip writes to tell the fission track community that he (and others) will establish a new fission track lab at the Institute of Geology of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. (I do so enjoy getting mail!). Osamu Himeno does a literature search for us. Some guy named Sandy Grist tells us what to do to get more gristy sand, and of course the short track news.

I would also like to thank Trevor Dumitru of FT Stage Systems, Becky Jamieson, of Dalhousie University, and Mike Krochmal of Autoscan Systems, who by ordering advertisements have permitted the continued free distribution of On Track. Most importantly, I would like to thank the man who pays my salary, Marcos Zentilli, who by allowing me to work on this issue for many days now, has also heavily subsidized its production costs.


Short Tracks: News

The following news items appeared magically in my e-mail box in the last few months. First, Paul Fitzgerald wrote to say that after spending all of 1997 and some of 1998 in New Zealand working for Antarctica New Zealand as their first Science Strategy Manager, (sort of like a program manager, but for all the New Zealand science being done in Antarctica) as well as writing a new Antarctic science strategy for New Zealand, he is back at the University of Arizona working as a research scientist. He enjoyed his time as a young bureaucrat, but also enjoys being a scientist again - although he does miss the expense account. The highlight of his time there was a winter trip to Antarctica. He has fission track-based projects underway in Antarctica and the Pyrenees. He is currently on his next fieldseason in Antarctica (Dec. 98- Jan. 99) and upon his return can be reached at his new address: Paul Fitzgerald, Ph.D., Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, PO Box 210077, Tucson, Arizona 85721, U.S.A . phone: (520) 621-4052.

Paul also tells us that Scott Miller finished his Masters thesis, entitled-

"Landscape development of the transantarctic Mountains, Shackleton Glacier area, Antarctica: An integration of structural geology, geomorphology, and

apatite fission-track thermochronology" at the beginning of this year.

Maurice Pagel wrote to tell me that Jean-Jacques Braun is now working at ORSTROM in Yaoande, and is no longer interested in FT studies.

Barry Kohn informs us that with the appointment of Andy Gleadow as Professor and Head of Department of the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne in February 1999, the La Trobe fission track group, probably more accurately now called the Thermochronology Group, will be re-established there during the first half of 1999. The group looks forward to a new period of exciting research developments and practical applications. Note that the 9th International Conference on Fission Track Dating and Thermochronology will be hosted by the group out of the University of Melbourne (sited about 25 minutes drive from La Trobe) and all web and e-mail correspondence will be directed to addresses which will be based there (Ed: see ad this issue).


Special Announcement: GEOCANADA 2000

by Lisel Currie

Institute of Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology

3303-33rd St., NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2L 2A7, Canada

lcurrie@gsc.NRCan.gc.ca

A special session on fission track studies in Canada will be held at GEOCANADA 2000, a joint meeting of Canada’s major geoscience societies, including the Geological Association of Canada, the Mineralogical Association of Canada, the Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists, the Canadian Society of Exploration Geophysicists, and many more. The meeting will be held at the University of Calgary, Alberta, from May 29 to June 2, 2000. We feel that this special session will raise awareness of ongoing fission track studies, and the potential for future fission track studies in Canada. (Note: Previously discussed plans for a Fission Tracks in Canada workshop, and a low temperature thermochronometry short course have been put on hold).

The special session should be of interest to many people working in the oil and gas industry, as well as most ONTRACK readers. However, we expect that this session will be significantly different from, and will not detract from, the International Fission Track Workshop to be held in Australia during the same year. Most presentations are expected to focus on fission track studies of parts of Canada. Keynote talks will address the application of AFT to hydrocarbon exploration and the analysis of tectonics and environments in a variety of geological settings. In addition we hope that the AFT community shall contribute additional presentations and posters regarding their current work in thermochronology.

It is hoped that papers presented during the special session will contribute to a special volume of the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences that will highlight Canadian fission track data and its application to geologic problems. The special session will be sponsored by the Structural Geology and Tectonics Division of the Geological Association of Canada.

Fission Track 2000

 

 

The 9th International Conference on Fission Track Dating and Thermochronology will take place at Lorne, Victoria, Australia on 6-11 February, 2000. The meeting will be held at the Cumberland Lorne Conference and Leisure Resort, which offers state-of-the-art conference facilities and technology.

 

Lorne, located some 140 km southwest of Melbourne in the heart of the Otway Basin, is one of Australia’s most picturesque coastal towns. Golden sands and rolling surf on one side, the exotic rainforests and waterfalls of the Otway Ranges on the other — and the magnificent Great Ocean Road hugging the coastline in between makes this a superb destination.

The Conference will cover all important aspects of fission track analysis and its modern applications in earth and related sciences. It will be structured to identify new directions of research. The program will run as a single session and include: thematic sessions, two workshops, poster sessions and a mid-conference field trip in the Otway Basin. Two field trips, one pre- and one post-conference each of 4-5 days duration, may be offered depending on the initial response received.

Contributions can be submitted either as oral or poster presentations, but software presentations are also acceptable. Oral presentations will be selected by the Organizing Committee on the criteria of originality and relevance of a submitted abstract to the subject matter of a particular theme or workshop. English will be the official language of the Conference, both for oral and poster presentations.


I’ve lost my apatite

by Sandy Grist

Fission Track Research Lab., Department of Earth Sciences

Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 3J5

(agrist@is.dal.ca)

(or There’s many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip!)

A fairly common problem encountered in the production of really good thermal history models and animations of evolving landscapes is that of a good sample gone bad. It started out with so much promise, a half split of a 150 mm diameter dirty sandstone drillcore that weighed about 2 kg with visible lamellae of (supposed) heavy minerals. You bash it through your standard procedure for procurement of apatite (jaw crusher, disk mill, tetrabromoethane (TBE) or sodium polytungstate (SPT), magnetic (Frantz), and di-iodomethane (MI) (even with constriction tubes), and then you look at it under the binocular microscope and..

Nothing (well almost nothing, few enough grains that you wonder if they are contaminants from the previous sample), and you ask yourself "What happened to the apatite?" So you painstakingly hand pick all fourteen euhedral grains and mount them in a nice line, polish and etch them (four had dislocations, four were zoned and the other six have only 10 tracks between them) (Oh yeah, this drillcore is from 4 km deep!). You get a couple of lengths from the zoned grains, and there’s your thermal history data. I hope this doesn’t sound too familiar!

So what went wrong? There are only two possibilities. Either there were only fourteen grains in the sample to begin with (This is the explanation most people tend to go with.) or somehow the apatite ended up somewhere other than on the grain mount. Its this latter possibility that I’d like to examine for a few paragraphs, and offer some tips that may help to increase the likelihood of getting a decent yield and more data out of that chunk of core. So lets look at what’s being done during each step of the process.

Crushing and sieving: I would suggest that you set your disk mill plates to a spacing of about 0.1 mm and don’t move them at all. Also, you don’t have to put the rock through the mill more than twice. The coarse residue after the second pass is dominated by quartz shards, micas, and flat cherty and shaly bits that tend to heat up and wear out the plates rather than crush further. All the apatite is liberated by this time. I might also suggest that you try out a set of ceramic plates. These are very pricey, but...(allow me to sell you a couple).

-They are harder than the tungsten/carbide steel plates. The ceramic plates we currently have on our disk mill have seen more than 100 samples of many different rock types and they show no signs of wearing out any time soon, which makes them economical. Also, the metal grinding plate flakes that get produced (which ordinarily end up in your sample, rust badly upon washing, turn your tungstate blue, and coat and contaminate your apatite grains) don’t!

-Ceramic is an insulator. They don’t get hot, which is very important for your peace of mind and also reduces problems that you might otherwise encounter if your disk mill has a thermal shut-off.

Don’t use a fine sieve to remove the fine-grained fraction (unless you are trying to get rid of drilling mud from cuttings). Apatite and the other heavy minerals tend to be more fine-grained than accompanying quartz and feldspars, especially in sedimentary rocks, and by tossing the fines you may be rejecting the most apatite-rich fraction. Use repeating washing to get rid of the fraction that is too small to work with (i.e. the clays and the powder that is produced by crushing). The fine-grained heavy minerals settle out more rapidly than light or flat grains and so are not lost. (a lab trick: If the samples smells strongly of oil and steadfastly refuses to wet, soak it in a solvent first (such as chloroform) to liberate the oil from grains or you will end up pouring a lot of grains down the sink.) The washing procedure is the same as you use to clean a sample after sieving to remove the fines, you just do it more times, so that the time you save sieving, you spend in extra washing.

Use a rectangular plastic flat-bottomed container. Agitate the sample with jets of water to a depth of about 20 cm. Wait about 20 seconds for everything coarse silt-sized and larger to settle out, and decant (pour off the muddy water without disturbing the sediment). For sandstones you have to do this about 20 times before the water becomes clear enough to easily see the sediment after the 20 seconds have elapsed. I know it seems like a lot of work, but at least the water isn’t toxic, and its necessary if you want your TBE or SPT filtering to work correctly (or at all!).

TBE or SPT: This is fairly straightforward and Dave Coyle has already explained the mysteries of SPT (see OnTrack vol. 1 no. 3) so I won’t. The key to success with these heavy liquids seems to be adequate stirring (see below). (As an aside, SPT forms a salt solution that is acidic, with a pH of about 2.7 when the density is about 2.8 g/cm3. It does not dissolve apatite, but it is hard on the hands if you don’t wear gloves.)

Look in the last magnetic fraction. Some apatite often ends up in the second-least magnetic fraction. Perhaps because it contains some inclusions or coatings that make it slightly more magnetic, or perhaps the apatite has a range of magnetic susceptibilities that depend on its composition, or it could be just that the Frantz is not 100% effective, but there are often a few grains, and sometimes many-many grains in this fraction. It is definitely worth checking.

Hand-picking definitely biases samples. It is also excruciatingly slow and should be avoided as much as possible. When you select your apatite a grain at a time there is a tendency to pick the most euhedral, clean-looking grains. It is entirely possible that those milky-looking rounded grains that make up most of the separate that you are picking are also apatite, and are quite dateable.

A test for apatite (another lab trick): If you aren’t sure if a mineral in the separate is apatite or not, here is one way to find out. Pick a couple of grains with a moistened 000 camel’s hair brush (or with a needle mounted on the end of a disposable chopstick moistened with oil from behind your ear, or whatever technique you prefer to use to pick fly dung out of pepper). Place them in a few drops of dilute nitric acid. If they are apatite they will dissolve in a few minutes without producing any gas bubbles. Of course this is a destructive test, so don’t use it if there are only a few of the grains present.

Mount some and find out for sure. The simple act of pouring an aliquot from a large-ish bottle of sample biases it (You tend to get large round grains coming out first.), so make sure that the grains you mount are the ones that you want to check on. One way to do this is to use what I call a paper slide (another lab trick). Simply spread the sample in a line across about a half-sheet of US letter or A4 paper and hold the end of the paper with the sample on it up about 5 cm (2 inches) and tap the edge lightly with a finger. The first grains down the hill are the large round ones, which could be some rounded detrital apatite from a blocky carbonate-rich separate, (this would be your sample) or it could be some of those annoying quartz-sulphide multiples (which would improve the purity of the remaining sample).

Next down the hill is the great majority of the grains (they tend to move together). The last grains down the hill, and those that refuse to slide tend to be the finest and the flattest. The finest may include some apatite. The flattest tend to be muscovite and/or quartz shards (These should have been removed by heavy liquids, but you often get a few hangers-on, probably from the sides of the funnel as a result of inadequate stirring.) which can easily be removed by sieving. You can do the paper slide several times and then mount the most likely looking fraction. I use the Naeser method using teflon-coated bakeware (yet another lab trick, and yet another culinary reference!) because it’s cheap, very flat and doesn’t stick to the epoxy. The mount is also so smooth that you don’t even have to polish it to determine petrographically whether or not it contains apatite.

You may wonder "Of what use are the most fine-grained apatite if they are too small to date?" (because for geometry reasons you can’t put your grid too close to an exterior surface). This limitation doesn’t apply to length measurements. You can measure the length of a confined track anywhere on a grain. The fine-grained apatite is very useful for making extra length mounts or mounts for Cf252 irradiation to increase the amount of length data you obtain. Of course it’s best to obtain your age and length data from the same grains, and in certain samples (like a 4 km deep drillcore) you risk biasing your length data towards more resistant Cl-rich grains relative to your age data by doing otherwise. However, with the exception of apatite from some granites it is often not possible to do this. The increasingly routine use of Ray Donelick’s technique of irradiation of length mounts with Cf252 to increase available length data is evidence of this. (A.C. calls this Californicating.)

Of course some samples are just duds, and no amount of scratching around for more grains is going to help. But drilling for that core cost about a thousand dollars a meter, so you are going to want to squeeze out every grain. I hope that this will help you to get a few more.

(Ed. Note: See what happens when you don’t submit articles!)


Swiss Tracks

by Diane Seward and Richard Spikings

CH-8092, Zurich, Switzerland

(diane@eurasia.ethz.ch/georas@luff.latrobe.edu.au)

Cartoon

Switzerland made its first siting of fission tracks in the 1980’s when Tony Hurford built up a considerable fission-track group in Bern. When he left, there was a small hiatus until the present Swiss fission-track group began when Diane Seward arrived at ETH; it has grown steadily since 1990. We are a mixed group, not two from one nation. We are Spanish, Italian, French, English, New Zealand, Chinese, Austrian, Bulgarian and a single Swiss (who is working over the border in Germany!). Richard Spikings and Diane are lucky that our communication language is English for all. During its life span, research interests have concentrated on the application of the FT technique to various geological problems and most work is a combination of tracks with another discipline. Projects have included: sedimentary and dynamic basin evolution studies in the interAndean valley of Southern Ecuador; a post-orogenic regional study of the Uralian Orogenic Belt; retracing the Gondwanan history of Madagascar; and an ever-expanding number of projects related to the development of the European alpine chain, the Himalayas and related basin systems. The purpose of this contribution is to present the currently active projects and a small amount of recently acquired data.

Europe

The European Alpine Project recently started with Meinert Rahn (our singing scientist) and Diane Seward in charge. The final goal of this project is to generate, with the aid of AFT analysis, a contoured exhumation history of a very young orogeny possessing a considerable amount of topographic relief. Basically, this means digging into the literature, compiling all existing data (and there is a lot!) and generating more, particularly track length measurements which are missing in most old studies. Data compilation and computer modelling shall be performed and will be presented at the Melbourne Work Shop. Because we have to restrict ourselves to an area that can be handled in a reasonable amount of time, (2 years), we will focus on the Central Alps, between Mont Blanc in the West and the Brenner line in the East. Additionally, the project will profit highly from several other contemporaneous multidisciplinary studies in the Central Alps.

Diane also has a project in the region of Pelvoux, southeast France together with a colleague currently in Nancy, France, as well as one in the southern Alps - not the New Zealand ones!

Bernhard Fugenschuh, who completed a Ph.D. at ETH in 1994 has established a FT lab’ in Basel (all of one hour away by train). He is concentrating his efforts in the western Alps and the Carpathians. Most of his FT work is combined with structural geology and detailed field mapping. For those of you not working in young terranes it is amazing (encouraging ??) to see how much fine detail Bernhard is being able to extract from his data set.

Giulio Viola has been a Ph.D. student at ETH for more than two years. He is concentrating his study in the gastronomic region of northern Italy where he is attempting to quantify fault displacements along the Periadriatic fault system. Additionally, he is also performing extensive structural field studies and laboratory analyses in order to investigate the processes of mylonite formation.

Lourdes Sanchez Rodriguez has confirmed, via the use of FT analysis in conjunction with a SHRIMP study on zircons, the extremely rapid exhumation of the Ronda in southern Spain. Lourdes has almost completed her Ph.D thesis and is taking a position with Shell Research in the Hague in December.

Alexandre Kounov , our Bulgarian geologist, is currently busy attacking geological questions of the Balkan Peninsula (without the aid of UN resolutions and a shiny kalashnikov). Alex is combining AFT/ZFT analysis with sedimentary basin and mapping studies in order to analyse the thermal and tectonic evolution of the Osogovo-Lisec core complex in Western Bulgaria.

Ecuador

After departing the 16th Latin American Kongress (October 1998), which was hosted in northern Bavaria (hic!), it was clear that with the exception of two folks, one from the UK and one from France, Ecuador has suffered years of neglect from geologists - they’re all further south in Argentina and Chile. However, Ecuador presents an interesting set of geological problems and ETH has been contributing to the study of Ecuadorian geology since 1993.

The Ecuadorian continental margin has been active for ~230 Ma, starting within the Tethyan spreading system and currently overriding the Nazca Plate. Traversing cratonwards, this period of almost continual tectonism has resulted in the superposition of an Eocene forearc sequence, late Miocene western Sierra, early Miocene interandean basins, a late Cretaceous eastern Sierra and a foreland basin which is commonly thought to have been developing since the Maastrichtian. These geologically defined regions rest unconformably on a late Triassic distensive continental margin which is in-filled with Jurassic carbonate and volcanic sequences.

The first contributions came from Dominik Hungerbuhler and Michi Steinmann (1 Diplom and Ph.D each) who combined zircon and apatite FT analysis with sedimentological studies within basins of the interandean valley. (Dominik has now moved to Shell Research and Michi is in Peru working for Glencore, so jobs do exist after fission track!) This approach resulted in tightly constraining the timing of intermontane and marine stages and hence the development of the Western Sierra as a prominant topographic ridge.

Our current interests are concentrated further eastwards (a weak attempt to avoid the aspirin starved Pichincha volcano) where we are studying the relationship between the development of the eastern Sierra and the foreland basin. The study includes a structural, 40Ar/39Ar and AFT/ZFT investigation of various regions of the eastern Sierra (Richard Spikings) and combined sedimentological and AFT/ZFT work in the foreland basin (Geoffrey Ruiz). Our initial objective is to test the geodynamic foreland basin model of DeCelles and Giles (1996). Quantification of the rates of structural development and foreland migration of the Sierra and its orogenic wedge system will be combined with a knowledge of chrono-stratigraphy, sedimentation rates, sedimentary provenance and the timing of development of angular unconformities within the foreland basin. It is early days, but initial AFT ages from the Sierra vary between ~ 80 - 20 Ma, and show considerable variation of ~ 50 Ma over N-S trending mapped faults. Apatite uranium levels tend to be low (< 5 ppm) so unfortunately confined horizontal tracks are scarce, however, initial track-length distributions are narrow with long mean lengths (> 13.6 : m). Sedimentological observations from the orogenic wedge suggest the foreland basin may have been initiated as early as the Aptian.

It’s always comforting to return back to friendly Switzerland, the therapeutic chirp of the cuckoos, clean pavements with evenly spaced cracks, and most of all, commanding officer Seward not yelling "is that tree trunk an anaconda or a tree trunk?"

The outside world

Prof. Zuyi Zhao visited ETH for one year during 1997 - 1998. After wrestling with the fission-track technique he is eager to establish a similar laboratory in Shanghai, China. Zuyi completed several sets of drill hole data from the Jiangsu Basin, north of Shangai and taught us all the rudiments of Chinese music while he was in the laboratory counting.

Diane continues to work in the Urals and Madagascar. These two projects are approaching completion and both seem to have some interesting information with respect to chemistry and long term annealing. The Urals are so boring... the same ages from north to south and east to west.... maybe we have reached the limits of interpretation that fission-track analysis can achieve when assessing post-orogenic histories of old orogenic belts. Samples from Mongolia also present the same problem.

Matevz Lorencak has completed a diplom (MSc equivalent) analysing the Shushwap core complex, in Canada. He plans to continue his academic career and proceed with postgraduate studies involving fission-track analysis.

Marc Jolivet appears as often as he can. He escapes the ambience of southern France for a dose of sobriety (!) in the lab here. Marc is working in the Northern belts of Tibet, specifically the Altyn Tagh and Qilian Shan. Apatite ages there range from 6 to 20 Ma, in good agreement with previous work by Tapponnier et al, (1998) based on tectonic and sedimentary studies. So far Zircon FT ages are all Jurassic, though this may change as his sample number increases. He is learning the methods here while completing ages for his Ph.D thesis. A brand new Zeiss microscope arrived a few weeks ago in Montpellier and it is hoped that a fission-track facility will be developed there.

Aufwiedersehen...(pet)


A letter to the editor:

Prague, 1 December, 1998

Dear Mr Grist,

I would like to inform you that a fission-track laboratory will be established at the Institute of Geology of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. Last year we decided to develop the laboratory for all our colleagues – geologists in the Czech Republic – to use the advantages of this method for propagating their scientific studies. This method has not systematically been developed and used in our country, and we hope for a good acceptance with the Czech community of geologists.

But the start is not so easy as it seemed to be at first. Fortunately, we have met many good people who helped us willingly.

I am very obliged to Dr. Ulrich Mann (Institut fuer Chemie und Dynamik der Geosphaere - Forschungszentrum Juelich) who involved me in his research project, and to the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for its financial support without which it I would not have been able to realize my foreign stay; during this stay I had the exceptional chance to work at the Forschungsstelle Archaeometrie of the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik at Heidelberg.

I am most grateful to Professor Wagner who received me friendly at his laboratory and made it possible for me to work there, and to Dr. Glasmacher and Dr. Jonkheere who helped me with my first diffident steps in the F-T analysis field.

I am greatly indebted to Professor Hurford (Research School of Geological Sciences, London) and Dr Kohn (Department of Earth Sciences, La Trobe University) who sent personally CN5 glasses and apatite standards to Heidelberg during my stay there and expressed interest in my efforts.

Dear Mr Grist, please would you be so kind as to inform the whole international F-T community about establishing the F-T laboratory at our Institute, and include my name and address in the International Fission-Track Directory.

I hope all the "Trackers" will accept a new member of their community with kind favour, and I look forward to meeting them at the 2000 Fission Track Conference.

Yours sincerely,

Jiri Filip

Filip, Jiri

Institute of Geology

Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic

Rozvojova 135

165 02 Prague, Czech Republic

Tel.: +420-2-20922628, ext. 248

Fax: +420-2-20922670

Email filip@gli.cas.cz


Recent Fission-Track Papers

Here is a list of recently or soon-to-be published fission track papers that were submitted by the authors for inclusion in this issue of On Track. I am grateful to the authors for the information. If you have a paper that you would like to see listed in this section, please send the complete reference or a photocopy of the first page to the editor. A copy of the entire paper would also be appreciated. We are also interested in non-fission-track papers that may be of special interest to the fission-track community. Papers in press are welcome, please include an estimate of the expected month of publication.

Fitzgerald P.G. and S.L. Baldwin, 1997. Detachment Fault Model for the Evolution of the Ross Embayment. In: Ricci C.A. (ed.), The Antarctic Region: Geological Evolution and Processes, Terra Antarctica Publication,

Siena, 555-564.

Fitzgerald, P. G., and Stump, E., 1997, Cretaceous and Cenozoic episodic denudation of the Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica: New Constraints from apatite fission track thermochronology in the Scott Glacier region, Journal of Geophysical Research, 102, 7747-7765.

Yegingil Y., Bigazzi G., Poupeau G. and Bellot-Gurlet L. (1998) Provenance studies of obsidian artefacts in Anatolia : the contribution of the fission track analyses, in : Light on Top of the Black Hill, Eds. G. Arsebuk, M. J. Mellink et W. Schirmer, EGE Publications, Istanbul, 823-844.

Bellot-Gurlet L., Calligaro Th., Dorighel O., Dran J.-C., Poupeau G. and Salomon J. (1998) PIXE analysis and fission track dating of obsidian from South American prehispanic cultures : an insight over the circulation of a lithic industry raw material, Nuclear Instruments and Methods B, in press.

Poupeau G., Saddiqi O., Michard A., Oberh‰nsli R. and GoffÈ B. (1998) Late thermal evolution of the Oman Mountains sub-ophiolitic windows : apatite fission track thermochronology, Geology, in press.

ED. NOTE: Submissions for this section were a bit thin, so Osamu Himeno graciously volunteered to compile a list of recent (Jan. to Oct. 1998) fission track papers for inclusion in this issue.


A list of recent fission track papers:

A list of papers published from January to October, 1998, located by a Georef search using the key-word ‘fission track’

Compiled by: Osamu Himeno,

Dept. of Mining Eng., Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan,

(himeno@mine.kyushu-u.ac.jp)

Current Address: Fission Track Research Lab., Department of Earth Sciences

Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 3J5

(ohimeno@is2.dal.ca)

Arne, D.C., Zentilli, M., Grist, A.M. Collins, M., 1998. Constraints on the timing of thrusting during the Eurekan Orogeny, Canadian Arctic Archipelago; an integrated approach to thermal history analysis. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences = Journal Canadien des Sciences de la Terre. 35, 1, 30-38.

Bhandari, N., Murty-S,V.S., Suthar, K.M., Shukla, A.D., Ballabh, G.M., Sisodia, M.S., Vaya, V.K., 1998. The orbit and exposure history of the Piplia Kalan eucrite. Meteoritics & Planetary Science. 33, 3, 455 - 461.

Brandon, M.T., Roden-Tice, M. K., Garver, J.I., 1998. Late Cenozoic exhumation of the Cascadia accretionary wedge in the Olympic Mountains, Northwest Washington State. Geological Society of America Bulletin. 110, 8, 985-1009.

Bouilin, J.P, Poupeau, G., Tricart, P., Bigot, C.F., Mascle, G., Torelli, L., Compagnoni, R., Mascle, J., Pecher, A., Peis, D., Rekhiss, F., Rolfo, F., 1998. Premieres donnees thermo-chronologiques sur les socles sarde et kabylo-peloritain submerges dans le canal de Sardaigne (Mediterranee occidentale). In Comptes Rendus de l'Academie des Sciences, Serie II. Sciences de la Terre et des Planetes, Gauthier-Villars. Montrouge, France. 326, 8, 561-566.

Carter, L.S., Kelley, S.A., Blackwell, D.D., Naeser, N.D., 1998. Heat flow and thermal history of the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma. AAPG Bulletin. 82, 2, 291-316.

Clift, P.D, Carter, A., Hurford, A.J., 1998. The erosional and uplift history of NE Atlantic passive margins; constrains on a passing plume. Journal of the Geological Society of London. 155, Part 5, 787-800.

Coyle, D.A., Wagner, G.A., 1998. Positioning the titanite fission-track partial annealing zone. Chemical Geology. 149, 1-2, 117-125.

Duncan, W.I., Green, P.F., Duddy, I.R., 1998. Source rock burial history and seal effectiveness; key facets to understanding hydrocarbon exploration potential in the East and central Irish Sea basins. AAPG Bulletin. 82, 7, 1401-1415.

Gunnell,Y., 1998. Passive margin uplifts and their influence on climatic change and weathering patterns of tropical shield regions. Global and Planetary Change. 18, 1-2, 47-57.

Gunnell, Y. and Fleitout, L., 1998. Shoulder uplift of the Western Ghats passive margin, India, a denudational model. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms. 23, 5, 391-404.

Henderson, R.A., 1998. Eustatic and palaeoenvironmental assessment of the Mid-Cretaceous Bathurst Island Group of the Money Shoals Platform, northern Australia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 138, 1-4, 115-138.

Leland, J., Reid, M.R., Burbank, D.W., Finkel, R., Caffee, M., 1998. Incision and differential bedrock uplift along the Indus River near Nanga Parbat, Pakistan Himalaya, from (super 10) Be and (super 26) Al exposure age dating of bedrock straths. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 154, 1-4, 93-107.

Mortimer, N., Herzer, R.H., Gans, P.B., Parkinson, D.L., Seward, D., 1998. Basement geology from Three Kings Ridge to West Norfolk Ridge, Southwest Pacific Ocean; evidence from petrology, geochemistry and isotopic dating of dredge samples. Marine Geology. 148, 3-4, 135-162.

Morwood, M.J., O'Sullivan, P.B., Aziz, F., Raza, A., 1998. Fission-track ages of stone tools and fossils on the east Indonesian Island of Flores. Nature (London). 392, 6672, 173-176.

Moss, S.J., Carter, A., Baker, S., Hurford, A.J., 1998. A late Oligocene tectono-volcanic event in East Kalimantan and the implications for tectonics and sedimentation in Borneo. Journal of the Geological Society of London. 155, Part 1, 177-192.

Scott, R.J., Foster, D.A., Lister, G.S., 1998. Tectonic implications of rapid cooling of lower plate rocks from the Buckskin-Rawhide metamorphic core complex, west-central Arizona. Geological Society of America Bulletin. 110, 5, 588-614.

Sosson, M., Morillon, A.C., Bourgois, J., Feraud, G., Poupeau, G., Saint, M.P., 1998. Late exhumation stages of the Alpujarride Complex (western Betic Cordilleras, Spain); new thermochronological and structural data on Los Reales and Ojen nappes. Tectonophysics. 285, 3-4, 253-273.

Thomson, S.N., Stoeckhert, B., Brix, M.R., 1998. Thermochronology of the high-pressure metamorphic rocks of Crete, Greece; implications for the speed of tectonic processes. Geology (Boulder). 26, 3, 259-262.

Wolf, R.A., Farley, K.A., Kass, D.M., 1998. Modeling of the temperature sensitivity of the apatite (U-Th)/ He thermochronometer. Chemical Geology. 148, 1-2, 105-114.

Yamada, R. Yoshioka, T., Watanabe, K., Tagami, T., Nakamura, H., Hashimoto, T., Nishimura, S., 1998. Comparison of experimental techniques to increase the number of measurable confined fission tracks in zircon. Chemical Geology. 149, 1-2, 99-107.

Zeng, T and Dong, W., 1998. Comparison between a numerical model and an investigating model on the uplift of the Qinghai-Xizang (Tibetan) Plateau. Chinese Science Bulletin. 43, 8, 676-678.


Call for Contributions to the May/June 1999 On Track issue 18

The next issue of On Track is scheduled for release in late May/June, 1999 and we are looking for contributions. On Track welcomes contributions of virtually any kind, including news, gossip, job openings, descriptions of new lab techniques, reviews of useful products, raving editorials about what all the other labs are doing wrong, meeting announcements, cartoons, and descriptions of what you are doing in your research.

If you would like to contribute, please send the final text no later than May 15, 1999. If you propose to submit a substantial article, please let the editor know ASAP.

On Track includes a list of recent and forthcoming Fission Track papers. If you know of a paper that was published recently or is in press and should appear in the near future, please let me know so that it can be added to the list. Also, if you happen to move locations (or know someone who has moved) due to a change in jobs or finishing off the thesis and graduating, please inform us.

On Track is also happy to run Advertisements. Please contact the editor for advertising rates. On Track has remained free of charge and will continue to do so (at least for the near future). However, to save costs we generally mail only one copy per lab so please be sure to photocopy the lab copy and pass copies around your lab. If possible, we will also send out On Track electronically, so please make sure the editor has an up-to-date e-mail address for each person/lab. Send contributions to:

Alexander (Sandy) Grist, Fission Track Research Laboratory,

Department of Earth Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 3J5

Phone: (902) 494-2372; Fax: (902) 494-6889; E-mail: (agrist@is.dal.ca)


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1998 UPDATE OF THE INTERNATIONAL FISSION-TRACK DIRECTORY

This directory is published solely for the information of fission-track researchers. It is neither a comprehensive directory including all fission-track researchers nor an official document endorsing the scientific stand of individuals by the fission-track community. We provide here an update with the hope that we have accounted for the changes in addresses that have occurred since the last release of the directory. If you have changed your address, know someone else who has or think that someone should be on this list, please let the Editor know (agrist@is.dal.ca).

 

Aizawa, Minoru

Dept. of Geology

Imperial College

Prince Consort Road

London SW7 2BP, UK

Tel.: +44 (0) 171-594-6468

Fax: +44 (0) 171-594-6464

E: m.aizawa@ic.ac.uk

Andriessen, Paul A.M.

Laboratorium voor Isotopen Geologie

Faculteit der Aardwetenschappen

Vrije Universiteit de Boelelaan 1085

1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Arne, Dennis C.

Dept. of Geology

Univ. of Ballarat, P.O. Box 663

Ballarat, VIC 3352, Australia

Tel.: 61-53-279-290,

Fax: 61-53-279-144

E: D.Arne@ballarat.edu.au

Bal, K. D.

Fission Track Laboratory

KDM Institute of Petrol. Exploration

Oil and Natural Gas Corporation

Dehradun, India.

Baldwin, Suzanne

Dept. of Geosciences

Univ. of Arizona

Tucson, AZ 85721, USA

Balestrieri, Maria Laura

Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra

via S. Maria, 53

56126 Pisa, Italy

Barbero, Luis

Dpto Geologia

Facultad de Ciencias del Mar

Universidad de Cadiz

1150 Puerto Real, Cadiz

Spain

Tel.: int-34-956-470824

Fax: int-34-956-470864

Belton, Dave X.

Department of Earth Sciences

La Trobe University

Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Tel.: 61-3-479-2630

Fax: 61-3-479-1272

E: geodxb@luff.latrobe.edu.au

Bergman, Steven C.

ARCO Exploration & Production

2300 W. Plano Parkway

Plano, TX 75075-8499, USA

Tel.: 1-214-754-6264

Fax: 1-214-754-6807

E: BERGMAN@mail.arco.com

Bigazzi, Giulio

Instituto di Geochronologia e

Geochimica Isotopica,

CNR, via Cardinale Maffi, 36

56127 Pisa, Italy

Tel.: +39-50-560430/560110

Fax: +39-50-589008

Blythe, Ann E.

Dept. of Earth Sciences

Univ. of Southern California

Los Angeles, CA 93106, USA

E: blythe@earth.usc.edu

Boettcher, Stefan S.

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Univ. of Texas at Austin

Austin, TX 78712, USA

Tel.: 1-512-471-8547

Fax: 1-512-471-9425

E: sboett@maestro.geo.utexas.edu

Bojar, Ana-Voica

Insitute für Geologie and

Paläontologie

Karl-Franzens Universität

Heinrichstraße 26

A-8010 Graz, Austria

Fax: 43-316-382885

Brandon, Mark T.

Dept. of Geology and

Geophysics,

Kline Geology Laboratory

P.O. Box 6666

Yale Univ.

New Haven, CT 06511, USA

Brix, Manfred R.

Ruhr-Universität Bochmum,

Fakultat fur, Geowissenschaften

Institu fur Geologie

Postfach 102148

Universitätsstraße 150

D-W 4630 Bochum 1, Germany

Tel.: +49-234-700-3236

Fax: +49-234-709-4179

Brown, Roderick W.

Department of Earth Sciences

La Trobe University

Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Tel.: 61-3-479-1368

Fax: 61-3-479-1272

E: rod.brown@latrobe.edu.au

Brunel, Maurice

ISTEEM GGP laboratory CC 058

Universite Montpellier II

1 Place E. Bataillon

34095 Montpellier

Cedex,, France

E: brunel@dstu.univ-montp2.fr

Burchart, Jan

Institute of Geological Sciences

Polish Academy of Sciences

Zwirki i Wigury 93

02-089 Warsaw, Poland

Buck, Steve

Mobil North Sea Ltd.

Union Row

Aberdeen AB1 1SA, Scotland UK

E: spbuck@abz.mobil.com

Calmus, Thierry

Instituto de Geología

Estación Regional del Noroeste

Universidad Nacional Autonoma

de México

Apartado Postal 1039

Hermosillo, Sonora, 8300, Mexico

E: tcalmus@servidor.unam.mx

Carlson, William D.

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Univ. of Texas at Austin

Austin, TX 78712, USA

Tel.: 1-512-471-4770

Fax: 1-512-471-9425

E: wcarlson@ccwf.cc.utexas.edu

Carpena, Joelle

DSD-SCS-LGCA

C.E.N. Cadarache

13108 Saint Paul lez Durance CDX,

France

Carpenter, Stephen B.

A505 Administration Bldg.

National Institute of Standards and

Technology,

Gaithersburg, MD 20841, USA

Carter, Andrew

Fission Track Research Group

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Univ. College London

London WC1E 6BT, UK

Tel.: (0)171-380-7777 ext 2418

Fax: (0)171-813-2802

E: a.carter@ucl.ac.uk

Cederbom, Charlotte

Institution of Geology

Earth Sciences Centre

S-413 81 Gothenburg, Sweden

Tel.: +46 31 773 2800

Fax: +46 31 773 2849

E: cederbom@geo.gu.se

Chambaudet, Alain

Universite de Franche-Comte

U.F.R. des Sciences et des

Techniques,

Laboratoire de Microanalyses

Nucleaires,

16 route de Gray

F-25030 Besancon Cedex, France

Clavero, Jorge

Sernageomin

Av. Sta. Maria 0104

Casilla 10465

Providencia, Santiago de Chile

Tel: (56-2) 737-5050

Fax: (56-2) 777-1906

E: JClavero@SERNAGEOMIN.cl

Coleman, Max

Research Inst. for Sedimentology

The Univ. of Reading

PO Box 227, Whiteknights

Reading, RG6 6AB, UK

Cloos, Mark

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Univ. of Texas at Austin

Austin, TX 78712, USA

Tel.: 1-512-471-4170,

Fax: 1-512-471-9425

E: cloos@maestro.geo.utexas.edu

Corrigan, Jeff D.

ARCO Exploration & Production

2300 W. Plano Parkway

Plano, TX 75075, USA

Tel.: 1-214-509-4090

E: dprjdc@arco.com

Coyle, David A.

Tensor Information Systems, USA

Home: 1102 New Dover Rd.

Apex, NC, 27502-7129, USA

Tel.: 1-919-303-6607

E: dcoyle@tensor.com

or: dcoyle@objectfarm.org

Crowley, Kevin, D.

Director

Board on Radioactive

Waste Management,

National Research Council

2101 Constitution Ave., N.W.

Washington, D.C. 20418, USA

Tel.: 1-202-334-3066,

Fax: 1-202-334-3077

E: kcrowley@nas.edu

Currie, Lisel

Institute of Sedimentary and

Petroleum Geology

3303-33rd St., NW

Calgary, Alberta, T2L 2A7, Canada

Tel.: 1-403-292-7004,

Fax: 1-403-292-4961

E: lcurrie@gsc.NRCan.gc.ca

Danahara, Tohro

Kyoto Fission-Track Co., Ltd.

44-4 Minamitajiri-cho, Kita-ku,

Kyoto 603, Japan

Tel.: +81-75-493-0684

Fax.: +81-75-493-0741

E: BYU02730@niftyserve.or.jp

De Corte, Frans

Institute for Nuclear Sciences

Univ. of Gent

Proeftuinstraat 86

B-9000 Gent, Belgium

Decker, John E.

ARCO International, Inc.

Jakarta, Indonesia

E: JDECKER1@mail.arco.com

De Wispelaere, Antoine

Institute for Nuclear Sciences

Univ. of Gent

Proeftuinstraat, 86

B-9000 Gent, Belgium

Tel.: +32-9-264-6627

Fax: +32-9-264-6699

E: antoine.dewispelaere@rug.ac.be

de Wit, M.C.J.

American Research Lab. (Pty) Ltd.

PO Box 106 Crown Mines 2025

Johannesburg, South Africa

Dodson, Martin H.

Dept. of Earth Sciences

Univ. of Leeds

Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK

Dokka, Roy K.

Dept. of Geology

Louisiana State Univ.

Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA

Tel.: 1-504-388-2975

Donelick, Raymond A.

Donelick Analytical, Inc.

4819 Katy-Hockley Road

Katy, TX 77493-4826, USA

Tel.: 1-281-371-3346,

Fax: 1-281-371-0133

E: 72762.1465@compuserve.com

Dorighel, Olivier

Groupe de Geophysique Nucleaire

Univerite Joseph Fourier

Institut Dolomieu

15, Rue Maurice - Gignoux

38031 Grenoble Cedex, France

Duddy, Ian R.

Geotrack International Pty Ltd

37 Melville Road

West Brunswick

VIC 3055, Australia

Tel.: +61-3-9380-1077

Fax: +61-3-9380-1477

E: mail@geotrack.com.au

Dumitru, Trevor A.

Dept. of Geology,

Stanford Univ.

Stanford, CA 94305-2115, USA

Tel.: 1-415-725-1328,

Fax: 1-415-725-2199

E: trevor@pangea.stanford.edu

Duncan, Alasdair

BP Exploration

PG8G (2/4S W10)

301 St. Vincent Street

Glasgow, G2 5DD, Scotland, UK

Dunkl, Istvan

Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Lab. for Geochem. Research, H- 1112, Budapest, Budaorsi ut 45, Hungary

Tel.: +36-1-185-1781,

Fax: +36-1-185-1781

E: h6580dun@ella.hu

Durrani, Saeed A.

School of Physics and Space

Research,

Univ. of Birmingham,

Birmingham B15 2TT, UK

Tel.: +44-21-414-4691/4655

Fax: +44-21-414-4693

Eby, G. Nelson

Dept. of Earth Sciences

Univ. of Massachusetts

Lowell, MA 01854, USA

Tel.: 1-508-934-3907

Fax: 1-508-934-3003

E: ebyn@woods.ulowell.edu

Evarts, Russ

U.S. Geological Survey, MS-999

345 Middlefield Road

Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA

Fayon, Annia K.

Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

108 Pillsbury Hall

310 Pillsbury Dr SE

Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA

Fax: 1-612-625-3819

E: fayon001@tc.umn.edu

Fisher, David E.

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Univ. of Miami

Miami, FL 33124-0401, USA

Tel.: 1-305-284-3254

Fax: 1-305-284-4258

Fitzgerald, Paul G.

Dept. of Geosciences

Univ. of Arizona,

Tucson, AZ 85721, USA

Tel.: 1-602-621-4052

Fax: 1-602-621-2672

E: kiwi@sapphire.geo.arizona.edu

Fleischer, Robert L.

Dept. of Geology

Union College

Schenectady, NY 12308, USA

Tel.: +1 (518) 388-6985

Fax.: +1 (518) 388-6789

E: fleischr@union.edu

Foland, Sara S.

Amoco Production Company

1670 Broadway

P.O. Box 800

Denver, CO 80201, USA

Foster, David A.

Department of Earth Sciences

La Trobe University

Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Tel.: 61-3-479-1516

Fax: 61-3-479-1272

E: D.Foster@latrobe.edu.au

Fugenschuh, Bernhard

Geologisches Institut

Univ. of Basel, Basel, Switzerland

Galbraith, Rex F.

Dept. of Statistical Science

Univ. College, Gower Street

London, WC1E 6BT, UK

Tel.: +41-71-380-7192

Fax: +44-71-383-4703

E: rex@stats.ucl.ac.uk

Gallagher, Kerry.

Dept. of Geology

Imperial College,

London, SW7 2BT, UK

Tel: 0171-594-6424

Fax: 0171-594-6464

E: kerry@ic.ac.uk

Ganzawa, Yoshiro

Hokkaido Univ. of Education

1-2 Hachiman-cho

Hakodate, 040, Japan

Tel.: 81-0138-41-1121

Fax: 81-0138-42-3982

Garver, John I.

Dept. of Geology

Union College

Schenectady, NY 12308-2311, USA

Tel.: 1-518-388-6517,

Fax: 1-518-388-6789

E: garverj@union.edu

George, Pete

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Univ. of Texas at Austin

Austin, TX 78712, USA

Gibson, Helen

Geotrack International Pty Ltd

37 Melville Road

West Brunswick

VIC 3055, Australia

Tel.: +61-3-9380-1077

Fax: +61-3-9380-1477

E: mail@geotrack.com.au

Giegengack, Robert

Geology Dept.

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316, USA

Giger, Matthias

Dammweg 27

3604 Thun, Switzerland

Tel.: 0041-33-368-227

Giles, Melvin R.

EPT-HM

Volmerlaan 8

Risswijk, The Netherlands

E: gilesm@siep.shell.com

Glasmacher, Ulrich

Forschungsstell Archaometrie der

Heidelberger Akademie der

Wissenschaften

Max Planck Institut fur Kernphysik

Postfach 103980

69029 Heidelberg, Germany

Tel.: +49 (6221) 516-321

Fax.: +49 (6221) 516-633

E: Glasmach@goanna.mpi-hd.mpg.de

Gleadow, Andrew J. W.

Department of Earth Sciences

La Trobe University

Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Tel.: 61-3-479-2649

Fax: 61-3-479-1272

E: A.Gleadow@latrobe.edu.au

Graefe, Kirsten

Institut fuer Geologie

Universitaet Tuebingen

Sigwartstrasse 10

D-72076 Tuebingen, Germany

E: graefe@uni-tuebingen.de

Green, Paul F.

Geotrack International Pty Ltd

37 Melville Road

West Brunswick

VIC 3055, Australia

Tel.: +61-3-9380-1077

Fax: +61-3-9380-1477

E: mail@geotrack.com.au

Grist, Alexander

Dept. of Earth Sciences

Dalhousie Univ.

Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 3J5, Canada

Tel.: 1-902-494-2372

Fax: 1-902-494-6889

E: agrist@is.dal.ca

Grivet, Manuel

Universite de Franche-Comte

U.F.R. des Sciences et des Techniques

Laboratoire de Microanalyses

Nucleaires

16, route de Gray

F-25030 Besancon Cedex, France

Guglielmetti, Alessandra

Instituto di Fisica Generale Applicata

Via Celoria 15

20133 Milano, Italy

E: guglielmetti@mi.infn.it

Gunnell, Yanni

Laboratoire de Geographie Physique,

URA, 1562, CNRS,

Univesité Blaise-Pascal,

29 Bvd. Gergovia, 63037,

Clermont Ferrand, CEDEX 1, France

Hadler, Julio C.

Instituto de Fisica "Gleb Wataghin"

Universidade Estadual de Campinas

UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil

Caixa Postal 6165

CEP 13083-970

Tel.: 55-19-788-5522

Fax: 55-19-788-5512

Hansen, Kirsten

Geological Institute

Oster Volgrade 10, DK-1350

Kobenhavn K, Denmark

Tel.: (home) 45-31-42-18-94

Fax: 45-33-14-84-33

E: kirstenh@geo.geol.ku.dk

Harman, Rebecca

Department of Geology

Imperial College,

London, SW7 2BT.UK

Tel.: (0171) 589-5111 ext. 56411

E: r.harman@ic.ac.uk

Harrison, Mark T.

Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences

Univ. of California, Los Angeles

Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA

Hasebe, Noriko

Dept. of Science for Natural

Environment

Division of Physical Sciences

Kanazawa University

Kanazawa 920-1192, Japan

Tel. 81-76-264-5727

Fax: 81-76-264-5746

E: hasebe@kenroku.ipc.kanazawa- u.ac.jp

Hashemi-Nezhad, S.R.

Dept. of Physics

Tabriz Univ.

Tabriz, Iran

Hayashi, Masao

Kyushu Sangyo Univ.

Fukuoka 813, Japan

Tel.: 092-673-5883,

Fax: 092-673-5899

Hegarty, Kerry A.

Geotrack International Pty Ltd

37 Melville Road

West Brunswick

VIC 3055, Australia

Tel.: +61-3-9380-1077

Fax: +61-3-9380-1477

E: mail@geotrack.com.au

Hejl, Ewald R.

Institut fur Geologie und

Palaontologie

Universitat Salzburg,

Hellbrunnerstraße 34/III

A-5020 Salzburg, Austria

Tel.: + 43-662-8044-5437/5400

Fax: + 43-662-8044-621

E: ewald.hejl@sbg.ac.at

Hill, Kevin C.

Department of Earth Sciences

La Trobe University

Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Tel.: 61-3-479-1273

Fax: 61-3-479-1272

E: K.Hill@latrobe.edu.au

Himeno, Osamu

Dept. of Mining Eng

Kyyushu Univerity

Hakozaki, Fukuuka 812-81, Japan

Tel.: 092-642-3635

E: himeno@mine.kyushu-u.ac.jp

Honda, Teruyyki

Atomic Energy Research Laboratory

Musashi Institute of Technology

Kawasaki 215, Japan

Hulver, Michael L.

Dept. of the Geophysical Sciences

Univ. of Chicago

5735 S. Ellis Avenue

Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA

Hungerbuhler, Dominik

Dept. Erdwissenschaften

ETH-Zentrum

CH-8092, Zurich, Switzerland

Hurford, Anthony J.

Research School of Geological Sciences

Univ. and Birbeck Colleges,

London WC1E 6BT, UK

Tel.: +41-71-380-7704

Fax: +44-71-388-7614

E: t.hurford@ucl.ac.uk

Iriarte, Sergio

Sernageomin

Av. Sta. Maria 0104

Casilla 10465

Providencia, Santiago de Chile

Tel: (56-2) 737-5050

Fax: (56-2) 777-1906

E: SIriarte@SERNAGEOMIN.cl

Issler, Dale R.

Geological Survey of Canada

Institute of Sedimentary and

Petroleum Geology

3303-33rd St., NW

Calgary, Alberta, T2L 2A7, Canada

Tel.: 1-403-292-7172,

Fax: 1-403-292-5377

E: dissler@gsc.nrcan.gc.ca

Ito, Hisatoshi

Central Research Institute of

Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI)

1646 Abiko, Abiko city,

Chiba, 270-1194, Japan

Tel.: 81-471-82-1181 ext 8525

Fax: 81-471-83-3182

E: ito_hisa@criepi.denken.or.jp

Iwano, Hideki

Kyoto Fission-Track Co., Ltd.

44-4 Minamitajiri-cho, Kita-ku,

Kyoto 603, Japan

Tel.: +81-75-493-0684

Fax.: +81-75-493-0741

E: BYU02730@niftyserve.or.jp

Jacobs, Joachim

Fachbereich 5, Geowissenschaften

Universitaet Bremen Postfach 330440

28334 Bremen, Germany

Tel: 0421-218-3995

Fax: 0421-218-3993

E: jojacobs@geopol.uni-bremen.de

Johnson, Kit

Fission Track Research Group

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Univ. College London

London WC1E 6BT, UK

Tel.: (0)171-380-7777 ext 2418

Fax: (0)171-813-2802

E: kit.johnson@ucl.ac.uk

Jolivet, Marc

ISTEEM GGP laboratory CC 058

Universite Montpellier II

1 Place E. Bataillon

34095 Montpellier

Cedex,, France

E: jolivet@dstu.univ-montp2.fr

Jonkheere, Raymond

Particle-track-dating Laboratory,

Max Planck Institut fur Kernphysik

D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany

Tel.: +49 (6221) 516-337

Fax.: +49 (6221) 516-633

E: raymond@goanna.mpi-hd.mpg.de

Kamp, Peter J.

Dept. of Earth Sciences

Univ. of Waikato

Hamilton 2001, New Zealand

Tel.: 64-7-856-2889

Fax: 64-7-856-0115

Kelley, Shari A.

Department of Earth and Envir. Sciences

New Mexico Tech

Soccoro, NM 87544, USA

Tel.: (505) 661-6171

E: kelley@griffey.nmt.edu

sakelley@ix.netcom.com

Kendrick, Dan

Department of Earth Sciences

La Trobe University

Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Tel.: 61-3-479-1273

Fax: 61-3-479-1272

E: geordk@luff.latrobe.edu.au

Ketcham, Richard

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Univ. of Texas at Austin

Austin, TX 78712, USA

Tel.: 1-512-471-5763,

Fax: 1-512-471-9425

E: richk@maestro.geo.utexas.edu

Kim, Joong Wook

Dept. of Science Education

Taegu Natl’ Univ. of Education

Daemyung-2 Nam-gu, Taegu, 705- 715, Korea

Tel.: 82-53-620-1343

Fax: 82-53-620-1340

E: jwkim@taekyo.taegu-e.ac.kr

Kohn, Barry P.

Department of Earth Sciences

La Trobe University

Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Tel.: 61-3-479-1516/1274,

Fax: 61-3-479-1272

E: B.Kohn@latrobe.edu.au

Koshimizu, Satoshi

Yamanashi Institute of

Environmental Sciences

Kamiyoshida, Fujiyoshida,

Yamanashi 403-0005, Japan

Tel.: 81-555-72-6194

Fax: 81-555-72-6206

E: koshi@yies.pref.yamanashi.jp

Kowallis, Bart Joseph

Dept. of Geology

Brigham Young Univ.

Provo, UT 84602, USA

Tel.: 1-801-378-2467

Fax: 1-801-378-2265

Krochmal, Michael

Autoscan Systems Pty. ltd.

PO Box 112

Ormond, VIC 3204 Australia

Tel.: + 61 39 596 8065 / 8092

Fax: + 61 39 596 8369

E: autoscan@autoscan.com.au

Lal, Nand

Dept. of Geophysics

Kurukshetra Univ.

Kurukshetra-132119, India

Laslett, Geoff

CSIRO Mathematical and

Information System

Priv. Bag 10, Clayton South MDC,

Clayton,VIC 3169, Australia

Tel.: +61 3 9545 8018

Fax.: +61 3 9545 8080

E: Geoff.Laslett@cmis.csiro.au

Lewis, Cherry L. E.

Robertson Research Int. Ltd.

Llanrhos, Llandudno, Gwynedd,

North Wales, LL30 1SA, UK

Linn, Jon

WVDEP/TAGIS

10 McJunkin Rd,

Nitro, WV 25143, USA

Tel.: (304) 759-0519

Fax: (304) 759-0565

E: jlinn@crimson.osmre.gov

Lisker, Frank

FB5 - Geowissenschaften

Universitaet Bremen

PF 330440 Bremen, Germany

E: flisker@geopol.uni-bremen.de

Lutz, Timothy M.

Dept of Geology and Astronomy

West Chester University

West Chester, PA 19383, USA

Mahon, Keith I.

Exxon Production Research

Company, MS: ST-2164

P.O. Box 2189

Houston, TX 77252-2189, USA

Tel.: +1 (713) 965-7036

Fax: +1 (713) 965-2779

E: keith.i.mahon@exxon.sprint.com

Maksaev, Victor

Dept. of Geology,

University of Chile

Casilla 13518, Correo 21, Santiago,

Chile

Tel.: (562) 678 4112

Fax: (562) 696 3050

E: vmaksaev@tamarugo.cec.uchile.cl

Märk, E.

Hohrere technische Bundeslehr-

und Versuchsanstalt Anichstr.

26-28

A 6020 Innsbruck, Austria

Märk, T. D.

Abt. f. Kernphysik u. Gaselektronik

Institut f. Experimentalphysik

Leopold Franzens Universität

A 6020 Innsbruck, Austria

Marshallsea, Susan

Geotrack International Pty Ltd

37 Melville Road

West Brunswick

VIC 3055, Australia

Tel.: +61-3-9380-1077

Fax: +61-3-9380-1477

E: mail@geotrack.com.au

Matsuda, Takaaki

Himeji Institute of Technology

2167, Shosha Himeji

Hyogo 671-22, Japan

Maze, Will B.

Exxon Production Research

P.O. Box 2189

Houston, TX 77252-2189, USA

Tel.: 1-713-965-7223

Fax: 1-713-965-7951

McCorkell, Robert

CANMET, Mineral Technology

Energy, Mines and Resources

555 Booth Street

Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G1, Canada

McCulloh, Thane H.

7136 Aberdeen

Dallas, TX 75230, USA

Tel.: 1-214-691-6809

Meyer, Arnaud J.

ELF AQUITAINE-CSTJF L1/010

64018 Pau Cedex, France

Miller, Elizabeth L.

Dept. of Geology, Stanford Univ.

Stanford, CA 94305-2115, USA

Tel.: 1-415-723-1149

Fax: 1-415-725-2199

E: miller@pangea.stanford.edu

Mitchell, Melinda M.

Department of Earth Sciences

La Trobe University

Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Tel.: 61-3-479-1274,

Fax: 61-3-479-1272

E: geomm@luff.latrobe.edu.au

Moore, Marilyn

Geotrack International Pty Ltd

37 Melville Road

West Brunswick

VIC 3055, Australia

Tel.: +61-3-9380-1077

Fax: +61-3-9380-1477

E: mail@geotrack.com.au

Mora, Jorge

Dept. of Geological Science

State Univ. of New York

Albany, NY 12222, USA

Mora, Jorge

Escuela de Geologia

Minas y Geofisica

Facultad de Ingenieria

Universidad Central de Venezuela

Caracas, Venezuela

Murphy, John M.

Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

Univ. of Wyoming

Laramie, WY 82071, USA

Tel.: 1-307-766-5435

E: geojm@uwyo.edu

Naeser, Chuck & Nancy

U.S. Geological Survey

926a National Center

Reston, VA 22092, USA

Tel.: 703 648-6964 (Chuck)

Tel.: 703 648-5328 (Nancy)

Fax: 703 648-6953 (both)

E: cnaeser@usgs.gov

Nishimura, Susumu

Dept. of Geology and Mineralogy

Kyoto Univ.

Kyoto 606, Japan

Tel.: 81-75-753-4150,

Fax: 81-75-753-4189

Noble, Wayne P.

Department of Earth Sciences

La Trobe University

Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Tel.: 61-3-479-2630

Fax: 61-3-479-1272

E: geowpn@luff.latrobe.edu.au

Oddone, Massimo

Dipartimento di Chimica Generale

viale Taramelli, 12

27100 Pavia, Italy

Ohira, Hiroto

Dept. of Geoscience,

Shimane Univ.,

Matsue 690, Japan

Tel.: 81-852-32-6465

Fax: 81-852-32-6469

E: ohira@botan.shimane-u.ac.jp

Olesch, Martin

Univ. Bremen

FB 5 Geowissenschaften

Postfach 330 440

2800 Bremen, 00071-00 Germany

Tel.: +49-421-2183940

Fax: +49-421-2183993

Omar, Gomaa I.

Geology Dept.

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

Ono, Masako

Hokkaido University

Kyoyo-chigaku

N17-W8, Kita-ku

Sapporo, 060, Japan

Tel.: 81-11-716-2111, ext. 5309

Fax: 81-11-736-3290

E: mo@epms.hokudai.ac.jp

O'Sullivan, Andrea J.

Department of Earth Sciences

La Trobe University

Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Tel.: 61-3-479-3517

Fax: 61-3-479-1272

E: allanw@met.Unimelb.EDU.AU

O'Sullivan, Paul B.

Department of Earth Sciences

La Trobe University

Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Tel.: 61-3-9479-3517

Fax: 61-3-9479-1272;

E: P.Osullivan@latrobe.edu.au

Pagel, Maurice

Universiti de Paris XI — ORSAYTERRE Bbt. 504

90405 Orsay Cedex, France

Tel.: 33-1-69-15-67-55

Fax: 33-1-68-15-48-82

Pagliuca, Renato

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Pavia University

Via Ferrata, 1

27100 PAVIA, Italy

Tel.: +39-382-50-5839

Fax: +39-2-523-0197

E: ullayu@tin.it

Pan , Yun

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Univ. of SUNY at Albany

NY 12222, USA

Parand, Simon

Geological Survey of Iran,

P.O. Box 13185-1494 Tehran, Iran

Fax: 98216009328

Paul, Tracy A.

Dept. of Chemistry

Arizona State Univ.

Tempe,. AZ 85287-1404, USA

Tel.: 1-602-921-1306

E: agtxp@asuacad

Pengji, Zhai

Institute of High Energy Physics

Academia Sinica

P.O. Box 2732

Beijing 100080, PR China

Perelygin, V. P.

Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions

Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

Post Office Box 79

101 000 Moscow, Russia

Perez De Armas, Jaime G.

Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

Rice University., MS-126

Houston, TX 77025, USA

E: jaime@rice.edu

Petford, N.

Bullard Lab.

Dept. of Earth Sciences

Univ. of Cambridge

Madingly Rise

Cambridge, CB3 0DZ, UK

Poupeau, Gerard R.

Universite Joseph Fourier

Institut Dolomieu

15, Rue Maurice - Gignoux

38031 Grenoble Cedex, France

Tel.: (33)-(0)4-76-63-59-30 / 59-64

Fax: (33)-(0)4-76-87-82-43

E: Poupeau@ujf-grenoble.fr

Prashad, Rajinder

Fission Track Laboratory

KDM Institute of Petrol. Exploration

Oil and Natural Gas Corporation

Dehradun, India.

Price, P. Buford

Dept. of Physics

Univ. of California

Berkeley, CA 94720, USA

Tel.: 1-510-642-4982,

Fax: 1-510-643-8497

E: price@lbl.qov

Puch, Thomas

Insitute für Geologie and Paläontologie

Karl-Franzens Universität

Heinrichstraße 26

A-8010 Graz, Austria

Fax: 43-316-382885

Qvale, Henning

Institute for Energy Technology

P.O. Box 40

N 2007, Kjeller, Norway

Tel.: +47-63-80-61-22,

Fax: +47-63-81-55-53

E: hq@varney.ite.no

Rahn, Meinert

Institut fuer Mineralogie,

Petrologie und Geochemie

Univ. of Freiburg

Albertstrasse 23b

79104 Freiburg, Germany

Tel: 49-761-2036416

Fax: 49-761-2036407

E: meinert@mis01.mineralogie.uni-freiburg.de

Ratschbacher, Lothar

Institut fuer Geologie

Universitaet Wuerzburg,

Pleicherwall 1, D-97070 Wuerzburg, Germany

Tel.: +49-931-312580

Fax: +49-931-312378

E: lothar@geologie.uni-wuerzburg.de

Ravenhurst, Casey E.

Dept. of Geology and Geography

Univ. of Massachusetts

Amherst MA 01003, USA

E: cravenhu@geo.umass.edu

Raza, Asaf

Department of Earth Sciences

La Trobe University

Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Tel.: 61-3-479-2630

Fax: 61-3-479-1272

E: geoar@luff.latrobe.edu.au

Rebetez, Michel

Universite de Franche-Comte

U.F.R. des Sciences et des Techniques

Laboratoire de Microanalyses

Nucleaires

16, route de Gray

F-25030 Besancon Cedex, France

Redfield, Thomas F.

Technical Exploration Services

5 Frost Court

Mill Valley, CA 94941, USA

Roden-Tice, Mary, K.

Center for Earth & Environ. Science

SUNY Plattsburgh

Plattsburgh, NY 12901, USA

Tel.: 1-518-564-2019

Fax: 1-518-564-3152

Saenz, Carlos Alberto Tello

Instituto de Fisica "Gleb Wataghin"

Universidade Estadual de Campinas

UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil

Caixa Postal 6165

CEP 13083-970

Tel.: 55-19-788-5522

Fax: 55-19-788-5512

E: saenz@ifi.unicamp.br

Saini, Hari Singh

Dept. of Radiometric Dating

Birbal Sahni Institute of Paleobotany

53 Univ. Road

Post Box 106

Lucknow 226 007, India

Sandhu, Amanjit S.

Dept. of Physics

Guru Nanak Univ.

Amritsar 143005, India

E: cse@gndu.ernet.in

Schaefer, Thorsten

Universitaet Bremen Fachbereich

Geowissenschaften PO Box 330

440 D-28334 Bremen, Germany

Tel.: 0049 421 218 3994

Fax: 0049 421 218 3993

E: postgrad@geopol.unibremen.de

Schierl, Heimo

Institut f. Geologie und

Palaeontologie,

Universität Salzburg,

Hellbrunnerstraße 34/III,

A-5020 Salzburg, Austria

Tel.: + 43-662-8044-5437

Fax: + 43-662-8044-621

Schwab, Martina

Institut fuer Geologie

Universitaet Tuebingen

Sigwartstrasse 10, D-72076 Tuebingen, Germany

E: martina.schwab@uni-tuebingen.de

Sekyra, Gerd

Institut f. Geologie und

Palaeontologie,

Universität Salzburg,

Hellbrunnerstraße 34/III,

A-5020 Salzburg, Austria

Tel.: + 43-662-8044-5437

Fax: + 43-662-8044-621

Seward, Diane

Geology Institute

ETH-Zentrum

Sonneggstrasse, 5

8092, Zurich, Switzerland

Tel.: 0041-1- 632-7702,

Fax: 0041-1- 632-1080

E: diane@eurasia.ethz.ch

Shane, Phil

School of Environ. & Marine Sci.

Univ. of Auckland

Tamaki Campus

Private Bag 92019

Auckland, New Zealand

Tel.: 64-9-373 7599 ext. 6821

Fax: 64-9-373 7042

Shunsheng, Liu

Changsha Institut of Geotectonics

Academia Sinica

Changsha 410013

Hunan Province, PR China

Tel.: 86-731-8859165

Fax: 86-731-8859137

Siddall, Ruth

Fission Track Research Group

Geological Sciences

Univ. College London

London WC1E-6BT, UK

Tel.: 0171-380-7777 ext. 2758

Fax: 0171-388-7614

E: r.siddall@ucl.ac.uk

Singh, Gurinder

Dept. of Physics

Guru Nank Dev Univ.

Amritsar 143005, India

Sobel, Ed

Institut fuer Geowissenschaften

Universität Potsdam

Postfach 60 15 53

D-14415 Potsdam, Germany

Tel: (49) (0331) 977-2904 or -2047

Fax: (49) (0331) 977-2087

E: sobel@rz.uni-potsdam.de

Sohrabi, Mehdi

Radiation Protection Dept.

Atomic Energy Organization of Iran

P.O. Box 14155-4494

Tehran, Iran

Sorkhabi, Rasoul B.

Dept. of Geology

Arizona State Univ.

Tempe, AZ 85287-1404, USA

Tel.: 1-602-965-9852/5081

Fax: 1-602-965-8102

E: idrbs@asuvm.inre.asu.edu

Spikings, Richard

Geology Institute

ETH-Zentrum

Sonneggstrasse, 5

8092, Zurich, Switzerland

Tel.: 0041-1- 632-7702,

Fax: 0041-1- 632-1080

E: georas@luff.latrobe.edu.au

Stapel, Gerco

Inst. voor Aardwerenschappen

Vrije Universiteit

De Boelenlaan 1085

1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands

E: stag@geo.vu.nl

Steckler, Michael S.

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Palisades, NY 10964, USA

Tel.: 1-914-365-8479,

Fax: 1-914-365-8179

E: steckler@ldeo.columbia.edu

Steinmann, Michael

Dept. Erdwissenschaften

ETH-Zentrum

CH-8092, Zurich, Switzerland

Stiberg, Jan-Petter

Institute for Energy Technology

P.O. Box 40, N 2007

Kjeller, Norway

Tel.: +47-63-80-61-22,

Fax: +47-63-81-55-53

Stockli, Danny

Dept. Geological Sciences

Stanford Univ.

Stanford, CA 94305-2115, USA

Tel.: (415) 723 1010

E: danny@pangea.stanford.edu

Stockmal, Glen S.

Geological Survey of Canada

Institute of Sedimentography and

Petroleum Geology

3303-33rd Street, N.W.

Calgary, Alberta T2L 2A7, Canada

Tel.: 1-403-292-7173

Fax: 1-403-292-5377

E: GStockma@NRCan.gc.ca

Storzer, Dieter

Museum d'histoire naturelle

Laboratoire de Mineralogie

61 rue Buffon,

75005 Paris, France

Stump, Edmund

Dept. of Geology

Arizona State Univ.

Tempe, AZ 85287-1404, USA

Tel.: 1-602-965-3971/5081

Fax: 1-602-965-8102

E: ateds@asuacad.

Sumii, Tomoaki

Isotope Geoscience Section

Geochemistry Dept.

Geological Survey of Japan

1-1-3 Higashi, Tsukuba, 305, Japan

Tel.: 81-298-54-3558,

Fax: 81-298-54-3533

E: sumii@gsj.go.jp

Summerfield, Michael

Dept. of Geography

School of Earth Sciences

Univ. of Edinburgh

Edinburgh EH8 9XP, UK

Tel.: +44-31-650-2519

Sun, Shaohua

Changsha Institut of Geotectonics

Academia Sinica

Changsha 410013

Hunan Province, PR China

Tel.: 86-731-8887945 (home)

Fax: 86-731-8859137

E: shaohua@ms.csig.ac.cn

Suzuki, Masao

Rikkyo Univ.

34-1 Nishi Ikebukuro

3-Chome, Toshima-ku

Tokyo 171, Japan

Tagami, Takahiro

Dept. of Geology and Mineralogy

Kyoto Univ.

Kyoto 606, Japan

Tel.: 81-75-753-4153

Fax: 81-75-753-4189

E: tagami@terra.kueps.kyoto-u.ac.jp

Talbot, James

K/T GeoServices, Inc.

661 North Plano Rd, Suite 317

Richardson, TX 75081, USA

Tel.: (972) 437-9337

Fax: (972) 437-0455

E: jptkt@flash.net

Thomson, Stuart

Institut für Geologie

Ruhr-Universität Bochum

Universitätsstraße 150

P.O. Box 102148

Bochum 44721, Germany

Toro, Gloria

Universidad EAFIT

A.A. 3300

Medellin, Colombia

E: gtoro@sigma.eafit.edu.co

Upton, David

Fission Track Research Group

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Univ. College London

London WC1E 6BT, UK

Tel.: (0)171-380-7777 ext 2418

Fax: (0)171-813-2802

Vance, Joseph, A.

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Univ. of Washington

Seattle, WA 98195, USA

Van den haute, Peter

Geologisch Instituut

Rijiks Universiteit

B-9000 Gent, Belgium

Tel: +32-0-9-264/4592 or 6627

Fax: +32-0-9-264-4984

E: Peter.Vandenhaute@rug.ac.be

Van der Wateren, F. M.

Institue for Earth Science

Vrije Universiteit

De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Ventura, Barbara

Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche

Universita di Bologna

via Zamboni 67

40127 Bologna, Italy

Tel: +39-51-354579

Fax: +39-51-354522

E: ventura@geomin.unibo.it

Vercoutere, Caroline

Geologisch Instituut

Rijiks Universiteit

B-9000 Gent, Belgium

Viola, Giulio

Geologisches Institut

Sonneggstrasse 5

ETH-Zentrum

CH-8092, Zurich, Switzerland

Tel.: 0041-1-252-2227

Fax: 0041-1-252-7008

E: giulio@erdw.ethz.ch

Virk, H. S.

Dept. of Physics

Guru Nanak Dev Univ.

Amritsar-143005, India

Wadatsumi, Kiyoshi

Dept. of Geosciences

Osaka City Univ.

3-3-138 Sugimoto

Sumiyoshi-ku

Osaka 558, Japan

Wagner, Gunther A.

Max-Planck-Institut fur Kernphysik

Saupfercheckweg, D-6900

Heidelberg, Germany

Wagner, Martin

Institut fur Petrographie und Geochimie

Universität Karlsruhe

Kaiserstr. 12

D-7500 Karlsruhe, Germany

Wallace, Wes K.

Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

University of Alaska

Fairbanks, AK 99775-5780 , USA

Tel.: (907) 474-5386

Fax: (907) 474-5163

E: wallace@gi.alaska.edu

Walgenwitz, Frederic

ELF AQUITAINE-CSTJF L1/010

64018 Pau Cedex, France

Walker, J. D.

Dept. of Geology

Univ. of Kansas

120 Lindley Hall

Lawrence, KS 66045-2969, USA

Walker, Robert M.

McDonnell Center for Space Sciences

Campus Mail 1105

Washington Univ.

St. Louis, MO 63130, USA

Tel.: 1-314-935-6225

Fax: 1-314-935-6219

E: brw@wuphys.wustl.edu

Walter, Bob

Institute of Human Origins

1288 Ninth Street

Berkely, CA 94709-1211, USA

Tel.: 1-510-525-0500,

Fax: 1-510-525-0668

E: bwalter@iho.org

Waraich, R. S.

Fission Track Laboratory

KDM Institute of Petrol. Exploration

Oil and Natural Gas Corporation

Dehradun, India.

Watanabe, Koichiro

Dept. of Mining

Faculty of Engineering

Kyushu Univ.,

36 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812, Japan

Tel.: 81-92-642-3634

E: wat@mine.kyushu-u.ac.jp

Weiland, Richard J.

Dept. of Geological Sciences

Univ. of Texas at Austin

Austin, TX 78712, USA

Tel.: 1-512-471-8547,

Fax: 1-512-471-9425

E:weiland@maestro.geo.utexas.edu

Westgate, John A.

Dept. of Geology

Univ. of Toronto

Scarborough, Ontario

M1C 1A4, Canada

E: westgate@banks.scar.utoronto.ca

Willet, Sean D.

Dept of Geosciences

Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802, USA

Tel.: 1-814-865-3951

Fax: 1-814-863-7823

E: sean@geosc.psu.edu

Winkler, Jennifer

ARCO Exploration & Production

2300 W. Plano Parkway

Plano, TX 75075-8499, USA

E: jwinkle@mail.arco.com

Yamashita, Tohru

Kyoto Fission-Track Co., Ltd.

44-4 Minamitajiri-cho, Kita-ku,

Kyoto 603, Japan

Tel.: +81-75-493-0684

Fax.: +81-75-493-0741

E: BYU02730@niftyserve.or.jp

Yang, Tsanyao Frank

Dept. of Geology, National Taiwan University, 245 Chou-shan Road, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan

Tel: (+886) 2-2369-5568

Fax: (+886) 2-2363-6095

E: tyyang@ccms.ntu.edu.tw

Yegingil, Zehra

Physics Dept.

Cukurova Univ.

P.O. Box 171

01330 Adana, Turkey

Yoshioka, Tetsu

Kyoto Fission-Track Co., Ltd.

44-4 Minamitajiri-cho, Kita-ku

Kyoto 603, Japan

Tel.: +81-75-493-0684

Fax: +81-75-493-0741

E: BYU02730@niftyserve.or.jp

Zattin, Massimiliano

Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche

Universita di Bologna

via Zamboni 67

40127 Bologna, Italy

Tel: +39-51-354579

Fax: +39-51-354522

E: zattin@geomin.unibo.it

Zhao, Yunlong

Beijing Research Institute of

Uranium Geology

P.O. Box 764

Beijing 100029, PR China

Zeitler, Peter K.

Dept. of Earth & Environ. Sciences

Lehigh Univ.

Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA

Tel.: 1-215-758-3671

Fax: 1-215-758-3677

E: pkz0@lehigh.edu

Zentilli, Marcos,

Dept. of Earth Sciences

Dalhousie Univ.

Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 3J5, Canada

Tel.: 1-902-494-3873

Fax: 1-902-494-6889

E: zentilli@ac.dal.ca

Zhou, Zuyi

Dept. of Marine Geology and Geophysics,

Tongji University

1239 Siping Road 200092 Shanghai, China

Tel.: 0086-21-65982358

Fax: 0086-21-65026278

E: zzydmg@tju.ihep.ac.cn

Zimmerman, Robert Allen

U.S. Geological Survey, MS 905

Box 25046, Federal Center

Denver, CO 80225, USA

Tel.: 1-303-236-5626,

Fax: 1-303-236-5603

E: rzimm@greenwood.ct.usgs.gov.internet

Zuffa, Gian G.

Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche

Universita di Bologna

via Zamboni 67

40127 Bologna, Italy

Tel.: 39-51-354536

Fax: +39-51-354522

E: zuffa@geomin.unibo.it


FT STAge Systems

Automated microscope stage systems greatly increase operator productivity by automating tedious aspects of microscope work. Since their introduction, our systems have been adopted by far more fission track laboratories than any other system.

Outstanding Hardware:

Our stage systems are based on a highly-reliable, high-precision Kinetek™ computer-automated microscope scanning stage. Several hundred Kinetek stages are currently in operation, mainly in the microelectronics industry. Compatible with almost any brand of microscope. Use of this popular, general purpose stage significantly reduces the system cost. System also includes a high-quality Calcomp™ 12x12" digitizing tablet. Assembly to full operational status generally requires only a few days.

Outstanding Software:

Software is a complete, highly sophisticated Apple Macintosh program developed with careful attention to all aspects of microscope work. Fully integrates track counting, track length measurement, slide scanning, and file management functions. Moves precisely from grain to mica print in 3 seconds. Very user friendly. Fully functional with a new Macintosh or a very inexpensive old Macintosh, and with MS-Windows compatible Macintoshes.

Innovative, Highly-Intuitive Stage Control System:

Stage is driven primarily with the digitizing tablet cursor rather than a joystick. For example, to center a grain or track, just superimpose the cursor on it, push a button, and the stage automatically centers it. This avoids tedious manual centering via the joystick. Most software commands are driven from the cursor buttons, which are easily distinguished by feel, so there is no need to look away from the eyepieces to the computer screen or keyboard.

Fission Track Laboratories Using the System:

•Stanford University, Stanford, California, installed in 1991

•University of California, Santa Barbara, California, installed in 1992

•ARCO Exploration and Production Technology, Plano, Texas, installed in 1992

•Universität Bremen, Bremen, Germany, installed in 1993

•E.T.H., Zürich, Switzerland, installed in 1993 using a preexisting stage

•Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, installed in 1993

•University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, installed in 1993

•University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, installed in 1993

•Max-Planck-Institut, Heidelberg, Germany, installed in 1993 using a preexisting stage

•Union College, Schenectady, New York, installed in 1994

•Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, installed in 1994 using a new Zeiss stage

•La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, installed in 1994 using two new Zeiss stages

•University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, installed in 1995

•Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, installed in 1995

•Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela, installed in 1995

•Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, installed in 1995

•Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry, Chiba, Japan, installed in 1995

•Universität Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria, installed in 1996

•University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, installed in 1996

•E.T.H., Zürich, Switzerland, second system installed in 1996 using a preexisting stage

•Geologisk Centralinstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark, installed in 1996 using a preexisting stage

•University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand, installed in 1996 using a preexisting stage

Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy, installed in 1997

Centro di Studio di Geologia dell'Appenno e delle Catene Perimediterranee, Florence, Italy, installed in 1997

•University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, second system installed in 1997

•Universität Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany, installed in 1997

•Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, installed in 1998

•E.T.H., Zürich, Switzerland, third system installed in 1998

•Universität Basel, Basel, Switzerland, installed in 1998

•University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, installed in 1998

•Universite Paris-XI, Paris, France, installed in 1998

Further Information:

An early version of the system is described in a paper in Nuclear Tracks and Radiation Measurements, vol. 21, p. 575-580, Oct. 1993. For detailed information please contact: Dr. Trevor Dumitru, 4100 Campana Drive, Palo Alto, California 94306, U.S.A., telephone (auto-switching voice and fax line): 1-650-725-6155

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TECTONIC PROCESSES

Departments of Oceanography and Earth Sciences,

Dalhousie University

and

The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Applications are invited for a tenure track assistant professor position in Tectonic Processes. The successful candidate will be appointed in both departments and will strengthen tectonics at Dalhousie by teaching undergraduate and graduate courses, supervising M.Sc. and Ph.D. students, and by developing and maintaining a vigorous externally funded research programme.

S/he will also be appointed a "Scholar" in the Earth System Evolution Programme (ESEP) of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIAR). Candidates should have an interest in quantitative interdisciplinary research in relationships between tectonic processes and Earth evolution. The successful candidate will have a record of achievement and assessed potential necessary to be appointed by CIAR. As a member of ESEP, the incumbent will be partly supported by CIAR and during this time will benefit from reduced teaching responsibilities and from association with an international network of researchers in earth system sciences.

A Ph.D. is required by date of appointment and post-doctoral experience is desirable. Applications should include a c.v., statement of research/teaching objectives, names, addresses, phone and emails of four referees; and be sent to:

Chair, Tectonics Search Committee

Department of Earth Sciences

Dalhousie University

Halifax, NS Canada, B3H 3J5

Phone: (902) 494-2358 FAX: (902) 494-6889

Email: earth.sciences@dal.ca

For more information access our websites:

http://www.phys.ocean.dal.ca

http://earthsciences.dal.ca/index2.html

www.ciar.ca

Applications will be considered as soon as they are complete, but will be accepted until March 31, 1999.

Dalhousie University is an employee Equity / Affirmative Action Employer. The University encourages applications from qualified women, Aboriginal peoples, racially visible people and persons with disability. In accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, priority will be given to Canadian citizens and permanent residents.

CIAR Scholar and Assistant Professor in Tectonic Processes

The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and Dalhousie University are committed to strengthen research at Dalhousie and in the Earth System Evolution program of CIAR through the appointment of a CIAR 'Scholar' (tenure track Assistant Professor) in Tectonic Processes. The appointment will be made jointly by the Oceanography and Earth Sciences Departments and be equally funded by CIAR and Dalhousie for the first five years, after which time Dalhousie will fully fund the position.

We are seeking a young earth scientist with proven abilities and outstanding potential. We anticipate that the successful applicant will complement Dalhousie's and ESEP's existing strengths and broaden our capabilities in the following manner.

EarthSciences and Oceanography at Dalhousie have established strengths in Oceanographic research (Physical, Biological, Chemical and Geological subdisciplines) and in Marine Geology and Geophysics, Geochronology (Argon-Argon, Fission Track and Luminescence laboratories), and Tectonics. In particular, Tectonics research encompasses aspects of structural, metamorphic and igneous geology, geodynamics, seismic crustal studies, geochronology, sedimentology and economic geology. We seek a person with expertise to complement and integrate across our existing tectonic strengths.

CIAR continues to support the Geodynamics Group at Dalhousie, which focuses on tectonic processes through the development and application of geodynamical computer models. These models include mantle-lithosphere interactions; crustal deformation and thermal evolution; the Earth's response to surface processes; and the formation of sedimentary basins and sedimentation within these basins. We seek a person with quantitative abilities who will contribute to the development and/or application of geodynamical models, will develop a complementary innovative research program, and will apply the results of this research to primary problems in tectonics.

The CIAR Earth System Evolution Program seeks an improved understanding of earth system interactions responsible for the development of the solid earth, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Tectonic processes, mantle dynamics and their consequences for the Earth's surface are held to be key components in the Earth System. The CIAR-ESEP network brings together an internationally respected group of scientists. The existing focal points in geochemistry and geodynamics will be broadened to include among other fields, paleoclimatology, paleogeography, paleobiology, tectonics and surficial processes. The Dalhousie 'Scholar' will strengthen the tectonics component of the program directly and the ESEP program as a whole by developing research that leads to improved understanding of the impact of tectonics on other components of the Earth System.

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