University of Texas at Austin
Libraries Home | Mobile | My Account | Renew Items | Sitemap | Help |
support us

University of Texas Libraries

University of Texas Libraries
Celebrating the Life

About the Library

Research Guides

Theses
and Dissertations

Virtual Field Trip Guides

Geosciences
Links

logo

orange divider image

Celebrating our 5th year On Track

CHRISTMAS SPECIAL!

OnTrack: The Newsletter of the International Fission-Track Community

November 1995, Volume 5, Number 2, Issue 11

orange divider image

Editor: Ruth Siddall,
Department of Geological Sciences, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.

e-mail: r.siddall@ucl.ac.uk

In this Issue:


One copy per lab; please copy and distribute

On Track is a biannual newsletter of the international fission-track community. It is printed in the months of May and November. The views expressed in On Track are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the fission-track community or the editor(s) of On Track.

Copyrights of by-lined articles belong to the authors and they may not be reproduced without written permission from the authors. Trademarks and patents are the sole property of the corporation(s) and/or individual(s) indicated in the article.

On Track will remain free, at least for the near future. However, to save costs we generally mail only one copy per lab so please be sure to pass On Track around your lab.

Printing and mailing costs for this issue of On Track were paid for by a monetary donation from Donelick Analytical, Incorporated and paid advertisements. Full, half, and quarter page advertisements for this issue were purchased for US$ 200, US$ 100 and US$ 50, respectively. Contact the next editor for advertising prices in the next issue of On Track . There is no charge for "short" ads by non-commercial entities (e.g., universities). Send inquiries concerning this issue of On Track to the current editor. Send inquiries concerning the next issue of On Track to the next editor.

PREVIOUS EDITORS:

Dave Coyle (1990-91), La Trobe University
Trevor Dumitru (1991-92), Stanford University
Rasoul B. Sorkhabi (1992-93)Arizona State University
Dennis Arne (1993-94) Dalhousie University
Richard J. Weiland (1994-95) The University of Texas at Austin

CURRENT EDITOR:

Ruth Siddall

Department of Geological Sciences, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK.
Tel.: +44-171-387-7050 ext. 2758 / 2418
Fax: +44 -171-388-7614
e-mail: r.siddall@ucl.ac.uk


Editors' Notes
Welcome to the eleventh edition of On Track! Firstly I must thank the last Editor, Richard Weiland and his Assistant Editors, Stefan Boettcher and Sara Burns for their sterling work in producing the last two issues. In addition, I would like to thank Richard for giving me so much help and information during our transitional period of editorship. The material he sent me has made this job a lot easier, thank goodness we both use Macs!
 

This issue has taken some time to put together - a month ago I feared it wasn't going to happen, but the articles finally began to trickle in, transforming it into a Christmas rather than Autumn edition. I also felt that some stop press information from Peter Van den Haute and Frans de Corte about the forthcoming Workshop in Ghent was worth waiting for. Other contributions are from Phil Shane with a note on the isothermal plateau fission track dating on glasses from ignimbrites and ashes enabling an improved resolution on the timing and activity of volcanism in New Zealand. Paul Green has kindly offered the use of his 'probe for analysing chlorine content in our apatites and Kerry Gallagher has offered his services in modelling multicomponent data sets. Not only that, there is a job on offer with the bonus of lifetime happiness thrown in at Dalhousie, Nova Scotia. Contact Sandy Grist and Marcos Zentilli for more info or read their article! There you go, a bumper Christmas edition with presents for almost everyone. Also included is the updated fission track directory.

I am presently trying to put On Track on the UCL home page of the World Wide Web. Things are not looking too good at the moment though - we haven't even got a home page for the Geological Sciences department yet ... Watch this space! However if you would like to have copies of this or future issues e-mailed to you, please let me know and send me your e-mail address. However for future reference (hopefully) the URL for University College London Home Page is http://www.ucl.ac.uk//. Geological Sciences should come up under the Maths and Physical Sciences Faculty in Academic Faculties, Departments and Research Groups.


8th International Workshop on Fission-Track Dating

8th International Workshop on Fission-Track Dating

Gent, 1996.

Information prior to the 2nd Circular.

The response to the fist circular of the Workshop was quite promising. Over one hundred scientists from practically all over the world have responded so far. It appears that the fission-track community is still growing and that still more countries are becoming actively involved in fission track research and its applications. The preliminary number of contributions amounts to about eighty five.

The 2nd circular will be mailed around December 15. Our mailing list contains the directory of the fission-track scientists that recently appeared in "On track". Trackers who for some reason did not receive this circular can still contact us.

The Workshop address is :

FT- Dating Workshop, Geological Institute, University of Gent, Krijgslaan,281, B-9000 Gent, Belgium.

- phone: +32 (0) 9 264/ 4592 or 6627

- fax: +32 (0) 9 264 4984

- e-mail: FTWORK@inwchem.rug.ac.be

Information on the Workshop is also available on Internet. The address is

http://www.rug.ac.be/

This is the address of the home page of the University of Gent . By selecting the conferences held at the university you will arrive at the Workshop page. Up to now, this page contains the information printed in the first circular and an electronic form that can be used by those who did not receive this circular to ask for one.

To help us with the practical organization we kindly ask all interested scientists who would not yet have done so to fill out and return the response card that joined our first circular

We hope to see you all in Gent next year,

Peter Van den haute and Frans De Corte


8th International Workshop on Fission-Track Dating

8th International Workshop on Fission-Track Dating

Gent, 1996.

Information prior to the 2nd Circular.

Preliminary Programme

The technical sessions consist of oral communications and poster presentations, with a short oral introduction. The major themes will be introduced by a keynote address. Based on the contributions that have been submitted the following preliminary programme and timetable of the Workshop have been established:

25/8/96 Sunday evening: registration and ice-breaker

26/8/96 Monday: registration
morning: Opening, track formation and dating methodology
afternoon: Dating and track stability.

27/8/96 Tuesday:
morning: Thermochronology of orogenic belts
afternoon: Orogenic belts continued; Poster session 1

28/8/96 Wednesday:
morning: Thermochronology of basements and continents
afternoon: social trip

29/8/96 Thursday:
morning: Thermochronology of sedimentary basins.
afternoon: FT analysis and landscape evolution; Poster session 2
evening: conference dinner

30/8/96 Friday:
morning: miscellaneous applications.

The key-note speakers and themes are:-

S. Cloetingh (Amsterdam) Fission track thermotectonics and geophysical modelling
M. Giles (Shell, Rijswik) Fission track thermochronology of sedimentary basins
A. Gleadow (Melbourne) A critical review of the fisiion track thermochronometer
A. Hurford (London) Standards, calibration and constants
M. Summerfield (Edinburgh) Fission tracks as tools in geomorphology
J. Vetter (Darmstadt) Track formation, structure and revelation
G. Wagner (Heidelberg) Fission track analysis of continental basements


THE STORY FROM THE TEPHRA BEDS OF NEW ZEALAND AND THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS AS REVEALED BY FISSION-TRACK DATING OF THEIR GLASSES.
by

Phil Shane

Department of Geology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3B1, Canada

It has long been known that volcanic glass is susceptible to partial fading of spontaneous fission-tracks even at surface temperatures and over a short period such as within the Quaternary. Work at the University of Toronto demonstrated that this problem could be easily overcome by a single heat treatment of 150deg.C for 30 days, and given adequate etching of the glass (Westgate 1989), an eruption age could be estimated. The technique is referred to as isothermal plateau fission-track (ITPFT) dating. From the simple and fast computerised measurement of track size distributions of both spontaneous tracks and those induced in the lab for heated glasses, we have found that a wide variety of silicic glasses from different source areas, and of ages spanning the Cenozoic, can be corrected for partial track fading. This has opened the door to tephrochronology in the late Cenozoic using the ubiquitous glass phase, especially in distal tephra beds which are mineral poor or highly contaminated by detrital material. For coarse tephra beds with chunky shards it is possible to obtain an age from as little as two days of counting. The error depends on the number of tracks counted and is routinely less than +/- 10% for Quaternary tephra beds from a single determination. Of course with several age determinations this error can be greatly reduced (e.g. 3%) by determining a weighted mean age. For Miocene aged tephra beds from the western US we can routinely get a 3-4% error from a single age determination.

So the scene is set for application of this technique, along with careful stratigraphic studies and geochemical fingerprinting of the tephra beds. The North Island of New Zealand is an ideal candidate for this type of study. In its central region, the Taupo Volcanic Zone has been the locus of voluminous rhyolitic activity throughout the Quaternary, on a scale comparable to the better known Yellowstone region of the western US (Houghton et al. 1995). Peripheral to this region, sedimentary basins rapidly subsided and accumulated distal fallout tephra, ignimbrites and volcaniclastic units. Particularly thick sequences (hundreds of metres) of marine and terrestrial sediment are now uplifted and exposed on land, recording volcanic, tectonic and climatic changes (Pillans 1991).

The beauty of New Zealand (I'm biased, being a New Zealander) is that these high resolution records contain abundant correlatable and datable units. Since the pioneering work of D. Seward and B. Kohn in the 1970s, few geochronological studies pertaining to the late Cenozoic have been performed (Alloway et al. 1993). The Pliocene and Pleistocene units are dominated by a low-K plagioclase mineralogy, not immediately conducive to high precision Ar/Ar study. Recently, in collaboration with Tasha Black and John Westgate, and Brent Alloway (University of Auckland), we have determined ITPFT ages on 32 different units including both distal tephra beds and proximal ignimbrites from the central and southern North Island, and spanning the last 5 Ma.

In Pliocene deep sea sediments now exposed in southern North Island, we have traced several tephra beds on the basis of their glass chemistry between sections with well established biostratigraphy. By obtaining ITPFT ages on the tephra beds we can independently calibrate the occurrence and disappearance of foraminifer and coccolith species (Shane et al. 1995). These 'bioevents' are otherwise constrained in the New Zealand region from estimated sedimentation rates in deep sea cores. In some cases the fossil occurrences are anomalous relative to the dated tephra bed, and we assume this is due to local tectonically induced recycling. The Pliocene tephra beds are dated in the range ca. 3.4-5.0 Ma, and record early rhyolitic events of the little known Coromandel volcanic region, prior to the initiation of the Taupo volcanism. Coromandel is some 400 km or more to the north of the marine basins.

The rhyolitic eruptive record of the last 2 Ma is widely recorded in terrestrial sediments of forearc basins and marine sediments deposited in the backarc region of the North Island. Dated and chemically fingerprinted tephra beds allow us to correlate sequences of the two regions. From the ITPFT data, magnetostratigraphy and interpolated ages for intervening tephra beds we have identified at least 54 eruptive events in the interval ca. 2.0-0.6 Ma. This translates to an event every 19 ka on average. Most of these events were large eruptions as they were capable of depositing thick (>10 cm) primary tephra beds up to ca. 250 km from the Taupo region, and in some cases over 1000 km to the deep sea surrounding New Zealand. In contrast, sequences in the proximal Taupo region of central North Island are dominated by welded ignimbrite sheets and only 8 such units are identified in the same period (e.g. Houghton et al. 1995). Ignimbrite activity in the Taupo region appears to have started at ca. 1.6 Ma. The greatest frequency of distal tephra beds is in the interval 1.79-1.60 Ma. A lower, but continuous frequency of events then persists at least to ca. 0.60 Ma.

Some early Pleistocene tephra beds are particularly widespread. One such unit, the Potaka tephra, is conveniently located at the top of the Jaramillo subchron, shortly before the geomagnetic transition back to reversed polarity. Therefore it is an important horizon in New Zealand's Quaternary chronology. The top of the Jaramillo subchron is dated at 0.99 Ma by astronomical tuning of deep sea isotope chronologies (Shackleton et al. 1990). The Potaka tephra has been dated by the ITPFT method from 4 localities, and 6 ages give a weighted mean of 1.00 +/- 0.03 Ma.

We have found that the ITPFT method is also useful in dating proximal exposures of silicic ignimbrites where non-welded glass from the base of the unit is available. For example, from a single determination for the Te Whaiti member of the Whakamaru group of ignimbrites we obtained an ITPFT age of 0.34 +/- 0.03 Ma. The Whakamaru group represent the most voluminous phase of activity from the Taupo region. Houghton et al. (1995) report an Ar/Ar age from a feldspar mini-bulk separate of 0.34 +/- 0.01 Ma. The coarse glass shards (250-500 um) in such units greatly facilitate the use of the ITPFT method. The age of the glass directly reflects the time of the eruption. This could be important as some eruptives are known to contain relict phenocrysts from earlier crystallisation events (e.g. van den Bogaard 1995). Ar/Ar ages on the glass phase are not routinely determined, and therefore the ITPFT data provides an independent check on the timing of eruption.

From 4 determinations we obtained an ITPFT age of 0.23 +/- 0.01 Ma for glass of the Mamaku Ignimbrite (Shane et al. 1994). Houghton et al. (1995) reported an Ar/Ar age of 0.22 +/- 0.01 Ma. The Mamaku eruption was responsible for the formation of the basin containing Lake Rotorua and an extensive plateau up to 500 m elevation and 3000 km2 in extent. Fortuitously, the flow unit was emplaced during a paleomagnetic excursion in Earth's magnetic field (Shane et al. 1994), a relatively rare event. The age of Mamaku Ignimbrite is similar to that of the Pringle Falls episode recorded in western US (Herrero-Bervera et al. 1994). Therefore, Mamaku Ignimbrite may provide an important new age constraint for a widespread Quaternary paleomagnetic event.

New Zealand is not the only place where ITPFT dating is useful. We have been determining glass ages on middle to late Miocene tephra beds within the fluvial Sixmile Creek Formation of south-western Montana and eastern Idaho in collaboration with Jim Sears (University of Montana, Missoula). These tephra beds were sourced from calderas now buried beneath the Snake River Plain and represent the early record of the Yellowstone hotspot. Early attempts to obtain K/Ar and Ar/Ar ages on these beds which generally lack sanidine, were hindered by alkali-exchange in the glass and whole rock samples. However, we have found that other than some K-enrichment accommodated by Na loss, the glasses are otherwise isotropic and chemically similar to younger Yellowstone eruptives. We now have 7 ITPFT ages that bracket the interval ca. 11-2 Ma. These ages are in good agreement with the occurrence of Clarendonian vertebrate fossils. The chronology of the Sixmile Creek Formation helps constrain the paleodrainage changes in the region resulting from the passage of the Yellowstone hotspot with time. Local uplift perpherial to the hotspot passage has reversed paleodrainage directions in the last ca. 6 Ma.

References

Alloway, B. V.; Pillans, B. J.; Sandhu, A. S.; Westgate, J. A. 1993: Revision of the marine chronology in the Wanganui Basin, New Zealand, based on the isothermal plateau fission-track dating of tephra horizons. Sedimentary geology 82: 299-310.

Herrero-Bervera, E.; Helsley, C. E.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Lajoie, K. R.; Meyer, C. E.; McWilliams, M. O.; Negrini, R. M.; Turrin, B. D.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Liddicoat, J. C. 1994: Age and correlation of a paleomagnetic episode in the western United States by 40Ar/39Ar dating and tephrochronology: the Jamaica, Blake, or a new polarity episode? Journal of geophysical research 99: 24 091-24 103.

Houghton, B. F.; Wilson, C. J. N.; McWilliams, M. D.; Lanphere, M. A.; Weaver, S. D.; Briggs, R. M.; Pringle, M. S. 1995: Chronology and dynamics of a large silicic magmatic system: Central Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. Geology 23: 13-16.

Pillans, B. 1991: New Zealand Quaternary stratigraphy: an overview. Quaternary Science Reviews 10: 405-418.

Shackleton, N. J.; Berger, A.; Peltier, W. R. 1990: An alternative astronomical calibration of the lower Pleistocene timescale based on ODP site 677. Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh: earth sciences 81: 251-261.

Shane, P.; Black, T; Westgate, J. 1994: Isothermal plateau fission-track age for a paleomagnetic excursion in the Mamaku Ignimbrite, New Zealand, and implications for late Quaternary stratigraphy. Geophysical research letters 21: 1695-1698.

Shane, P.; Froggatt, P.; Black, T.; Westgate, J. 1995: Chronology of Pliocene and Quaternary bioevents and climatic events from fission-track ages on tephra beds, Wairarapa, New Zealand. Earth and planetary science letters 130: 141-154.

Van den Bogaard, P. 1995: 40Ar/39Ar ages of sanidine phenocrysts fro Laacher See Tephra (12,900 yr BP): chronostratigraphic and petrological significance. Earth and planetary science letters 133: 163-174.

Westgate, J. A. 1989: Isothermal plateau fission-track ages of hydrated glass shards from silicic tephra beds. Earth and planetary science letters 95: 226-234.


AFTA TODAY

by

Paul F. Green, Geotrack International Pty Ltd

Over the last 15 years or so, AFTA® methodology has seen a number of key advances. Back in the early 1980s, we had the adoption of the zeta approach to system calibration, and in the early to mid eighties the utility of confined track length measurements was recognised. In the late eighties, improvements in our understanding of annealing kinetics and system response led to the development of quantitative predictive modelling techniques. The early nineties saw greater recognition of the benefits of combining vitrinite reflectance data with information derived from fission track data, while the mid nineties have seen the advent of rigorous statistical techniques for determining thermal history parameters.

This article concerns the next stage in the increasing sophistication and sensitivity of our techniques - allowing for the influence of apatite chlorine content on annealing kinetics.

We've known since the early 1980s that chlorine content exerts a critical control on fission track annealing kinetics in apatite. In samples which have never been significantly heated, or which have cooled rapidly from temperatures sufficient to cause total annealing, compositional variation does not produce observable effects. However in samples that reach maximum paleotemperatures greater than about 90deg.C, variation in Cl content can produce differential annealing in apatite grains within a single sample such that grains with no Cl may be totally annealed while grains with between 0.5% and 1% Cl are almost unaffected. Just to emphasise the point, here are some plots of fission track age vs Cl content in four samples from various Otway Basin wells, at various present-day temperatures.

1: 75deg.C 2: 95deg.C

Fission Track Age (Ma) and Weight Percentage Chlorine graph Fission Track Age (Ma) and Weight Percentage Chlorine graph

3: 111deg.C 4: 124deg.C

Fission Track Age (Ma) and Weight Percentage Chlorine graph Fission Track Age (Ma) and Weight Percentage Chlorine graph

To interpret data correctly in terms of the magnitude and timing of maximum paleotemperatures, it is therefore critical to quantitatively allow for the influence of Cl on annealing rates. It took us a long time to get there, but three or four years ago we finally developed a "multi-compositional" kinetic model, based on a combination of laboratory and geological constraints (see On Track No. 5, November 1992), which allows for Cl content. We have also spent much of the 1990s developing rigorous methods for determining the timing and magnitude of maximum paleotemperatures from AFTA data (with +/-95% confidence limits). This is pretty straightforward for monocompositional data using a single kinetic model, but integrating the multi-compositional model into these methods showed us that it is essential to know the chlorine content of every grain analysed (i.e. for ages and length measurements). Otherwise there are just too many variables to obtain useful estimates. So in routine application of AFTA we now measure the Cl content of every grain we analyse (i.e. for both ages and lengths), and break the data down into 0.1wt%Cl groups for interpretation.

Interpreting data using mono-compositional models (such as published models based on Durango apatite) can lead to serious errors in assessment of both the magnitude of paleotemperatures and the timing of cooling. Not only that, but the spread in degree of annealing within individual samples caused by the distribution of Cl contents can produce variation between samples which can mask any variation due to different thermal histories, or at least make it difficult to be sure which effect is dominant unless the Cl contents are measured.

"Aha", I hear you say, "I am only working on granitic basement samples, so I don't need to worry about Cl variation". Well Paul O'Sullivan and Randy Parrish exploded that myth earlier this year with their paper in Earth and Planetary Science Letters (vol 132, pages 213-224), where they showed that many apparently "normal" basement samples contain significant amounts of Cl. Just to drive the point home, here are Cl distributions in three samples of granodiorite we recently analysed from Northern Queensland. The fission track ages from samples RD15-36 and -37 are higher than those of neighbouring samples with more typical Cl contents (like sample RD15-35), but this owes as much to their differing Cl contents as it does to their thermal history!

Durango Apatite Graph Durango Apatite Graph Durango Apatite Graph

RD15-35: 92+/-6 Ma RD15-36: 263+/-23 Ma RD15-37: 288+/-46 Ma

The fission track age of 92+/-6 Ma in sample RD15-35 represents early Cretaceous cooling from a maximum paleotemperature sufficient to totally anneal the sensitive F-rich apatites, while the more retentive, Cl-rich apatites in samples RD15-36 and 37 were not totally annealed. Because of effects such as these, mapping measured fission track ages on their own is not very useful if we want to reveal thermal history trends, as the variation will be very sensitive to the occurrence of Cl-rich apatites. It would be much more useful to map the age of discrete compositional groups, in which case we can expect that any significant variation is due to real differences in thermal history. The same goes for track length measurements.

You might say that measuring the Cl content of every grain analysed, for both age and length measurements, is too laborious, and/or maybe too expensive. Well, we can help you there, because we have our own electron microprobe dedicated to measuring Cl contents in apatite, and depending on the level of demand we are ready to provide measurements for other fission track groups. The system is set up to read grain locations directly from a file, in terms of x,y coordinates relative to a standard slide location, and it takes very little time to automatically move to all the grain locations and measure Cl. We are already providing this service to our compatriots at LaTrobe University, and we are happy to extend this service to the wider fission track community, for bona-fide academic research projects.

Once you have Cl contents it is a simple matter to break down the data into discrete groups so that you can compare like with like from sample to sample. That represents a big advance over simply comparing pooled data as at present. But wait, there's more!

The quantitative details of our multi-compositional model remain proprietary, and we have no plans to publish them at present. But if there is sufficient demand we would be willing to provide a service to outside users in interpreting data in terms of timing and magnitude of maximum paleotemperatures(again for bona-fide academic research projects only). This would require Cl measurements in every grain, as described above, and data broken down on a grain by grain basis.

What we charge for this service will depend on the likely level of demand. So we would like to hear from you if you are interested in having Cl measurements made in your own apatites, and/or proceeding to obtaining a thermal history interpretation of those data. It will mean sending slides to our lab in Melbourne, together with disk files containing grain location data. Results could be made available through email.

Please contact us for more information at:

Geotrack International Phone: +61-3-9344-7214
P.O. Box 4120
Melbourne University Fax: +61-3-9347-5938
Victoria 3052
AUSTRALIA

(is this advertising? - Ed.)

 


WHAT IS THE NORM FOR MIXTURE MODELLING?

by

Kerry Gallagher

Department of Geology, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BT

Anyone interested in understanding single grain age distributions should look at the relatively recent paper by Malcolm Sambridge and Bill Compston (Mixture modeling of multi-component data sets with application to ion-probe zircon ages, Earth Planet. Sci. Letts, 128, 373-390, 1994). In provenance studies, single grain age data represent samples from one or more parent populations (assuming compositional effects are allowed for). In this context, one interesting problem is how to extract the different age components (e.g. some estimate of the mean of the parent populations). Previous approaches have assumed normal or Gaussian parent distributions, so that the probability of a single age, Ai, being from a parent population with mean Am is proportional to equation. This is assumed as much for analytical tractability as any thing else, and in general, no attempt is made to assess the validity of this distribution to the data set in question. The Sambridge and Compston paper discusses a more generalised Gaussian-type distribution, where the probability is proportional to equation, where the vertical lines mean the absolute value (i.e. always positive). For a normal distribution, p is obviously 2, and this case is referred to as the L2 norm. When p is 1, we have what is known as the double exponential distribution, or L1 norm.

We all get apparent flyers in our data every now and again, and during the fitting process (i.e. extracting the age components) the L1 norm is more tolerant of these. In statistical terms, the L1 norm is more robust (less sensitive to outliers). The reason for this can be see from the figure below.

Probability Graph

Figure 1. Normal (L2) and double exponential (L1) distributions.

The probability of getting a data point relatively far from the mean is higher for the L1 norm than the L2 norm. Therefore, when we are trying to find the mean using the L1 norm, the estimate is not dragged towards the outlier as much as would be observed if we use the L2 norm.

If we compare a mixture of 2 normal distributions to one of 2 double exponential distributions, the differences are apparent.

Frequency GraphFrequency Graph

Figure 2. Two L2 and L1 norm distributions (ratio of 3:1) added together.

Choosing a given distribution depends on your data. Irrespective of which one you choose, it will often be useful to examine the answers using different parent distributions, particularly if you find yourself appealing to 4, 5.... individual age components based on a normal distribution.

Malcolm Sambridge and I have developed some software for this sort of age component modelling. It runs either on a Unix platform, with no direct graphical output or menu driven interface, or on a Macintosh (68K or PowerMac), with the usual interface and graphical output. Please contact either or us directly for more information (kerry@ic.ac.uk, malcolm@rses.anu.edu.au).


(is this advertising too? - Ed.)

Short Tracks: News

Congratulations to ....

Charles W. Naeser, a fellow of the Geological Society of America was awarded The Meritorious Service Award, the second highest award given by the U. S. Department of the Interior.

Bernard Fugenschuh, on finishing his Ph.D. at ETH, Zurich; title "Thermal and kinematic history of the Brenner area (Eastern Alps, Tyrol)." He will begin new studies combining further structural work with fission track analysis in the Western Alps, based at The University of Basel (note new address in the directory).

A new FT Lab at the University of Wyoming is being built, with all mod cons attached - lucky John Murphy!

 


COD FISSION DOWN EAST

by

Marcos Zentilli and Sandy Grist (actually I wrote this piece but Marcos needs the first authorship for his resumé)

Well howdy and greetings from Canada's (barely) east coast. As you are no doubt aware we just had a vote whether Quebec (the French Province) would declare its sovereignity and thereby break up the country. Well the keep-the-country-together side won by a whopping 1% (in numerical terms this represents one home game for Montreal's baseball team) so we can all get on with our lives again. As a sidebar, the separatist leader (just before he resigned) committed politcal suicide by blaming the loss on "money and the ethnic vote". It is true that 60% of Caucasian-Francophones voted to separate. So here it is just a few days later and the federal government is talking about reducing the current immigration levels. They must be nuts! Immigration just saved this country! Can you believe it!

Anyway this is a newsletter so on with the news ...

A Note on Pre-cut Micas

We recently bought some of those very nice precut micas from Moricke GMbH and started using them on grainmounts. As I was counting the second irradiation package on which I used them, I saw a very unusual sight, a TINT in my induced track image. I started looking around and quickly turned up quite a few more TINTs as well as a distinct background of tracks in the spaces between the grain images. The implication of this is that there was uranium present in the mica at the ppm level, a feature which could seriously compromise their usefulness (then again it might offset contact problems, but no ...).

I was able to complete the analyses by counting a "whole-bunch" (a technical term we counters often use) of epoxy spots (i.e. zeros) on the mount and then translating over to the mica and counting any tracks I found. I ended up with a uranium content of 0.32 ppm, and ended up subtracting 1.1 induced tracks/grid by way of a correction. This is something to keep in mind if you use these micas. We still use them but not on glass dosimeters, where it is impossible to determine the background level. Personally I prefer to cut my own mica (but I shouldn't be too self praising. I'm better than that).

Misogynists Need Not Apply

We are still (although admittedly half heartedly) looking for a PDF to take over the position that Dennis Arne left vacant when he got a real job in Australia. There is one thing that any interested candidates should know about before they apply, however. Casey Ravenhurst was our first PDF "technical director" and while he was he got engaged and married to a PhD student (Mary Harrington) from the pysch (psych? -ed.) department. After Casey left, Ray Donelick took over the post and he got engaged and married to a geology PhD student (Margaret Burke). After Ray left, Dennis got the job (he was already married so it doesn't count - no pun intended). Since Dennis left I have been wearing the technical director's hat (Marcos calls me the technical manager because I refuse to get a PhD) and guess what ... that's right I got a car! No I got engaged this Summer to Mai Nguyen (xoxo.. no date yet [again no pun intended]). She has an MSc in civil engineering. So guys this is your Big Chance. See the Maritimes and get married to a woman who is smarter than you are. Maybe we should hire a woman just to see what happens.

New Installations

Finally we are up and running with our new Autoscan (not registered trademark) stages. The stage itself is brilliant, and worth every Australian dollar. The manual however is for the old version and has no relevance whatsoever, and the software I wouldn't give two cents for. It has a number of curious glitches in it. For instance, every so often it tells you that the coarse alignment routine has failed because the two points you have selected do not form a pair (they do) especially if both your apatite spots have very similar x-coordinates. Also, every so often it locks up temporarily, and after you have hit half a dozen keys in an attempt to get it going, it informs you that you have hit the ESC key twice in a row (which you presumably have done) and that you are about to make an unscheduled exit from the program and all your data will be scattered like cyberdust into the solar wind or somesuch. Don't believe it, just hit the F5 key and everything goes back to normal. Also the check-point routine unexplainedly drives into a motor stop every so often for some unknown reason, and so on. It also creates 6 files for every analysis, which is hard on your supply of floppy disks (I still like it however).

Anyhow I should probably get back to work before Marcos discovers how I'm really spending my morning, so I'll close by saying all is well at Dalhousie (if you don't count the fact that they are in the process of closing down entire departments and other large chunks of the university for budgetary reasons (they call it rationalization) but the brand new astroturf field that was installed at a cost of several million Canadian dollars solely for the soccer team (the rest of the world calls it football) is gorgeous (now that's what I call rationalization). The lab however is prospering and a good time is being had by all.


Recent Fission-Track Papers

Please send all new publication details for inclusion in On Track to the editor. Also, please include any non-fission track papers which may be of general interest to the community.

Carter, A. Bristow, C. & Hurford, A.J. 1995. The application of FT analysis to the dating of barren sequences: examples from red beds in Scotland and Thailand. From Dunay, R.E. & Hailwood, E. A. (eds) In Non-biostratigraphical Methods of Dating and Correlation Geological Society Special publication. No. 89, p.57-68

Carter, A., Bristow, C. S. and Hurford, A. J., 1995, Constraints on the thermal history and provenance of the Khorat Group in Thailand using fission track analysis. Proceedings of the International Symposium: Geology of South East Asia and adjacent areas., Geological Society of Vietnam Journal of Geology, Series B, 5-6, 341-353.

Carter, A., Yelland, A., Bristow, C. S. and Hurford, A. J., 1995, Thermal histories of Permian and Triassic basins in Britain derived from fission track analysis. in: Permian and Triassic Rifting in Northwest Europe (Ed. S. A. R. Boldy). The Geological Society of London, Geological Society Special Publication No. 91, 41-56.

Fitzgerald, P. G., Sorkhabi, R. B., Redfield, T. F. and Stump, E., 1995, Uplift and denudation of the central Alaska Range: a case study in the use of apatite fission-track thermochronology to determine absolute uplift parameters., Journal of Geophysical Research, 100, 20, 175-191.

Galbraith, R. F., 1994, Some applications of radial plots., J. Amer. Statist. Ass., 89, 1232-1242

Gallagher, K. and Sambridge, M. 1994. Genetic algorithms: a powerful tool for large scale nonlinear optimization problems. Computers and Geosciences. 20 p1229-1236.

Gallagher, K. Hawkesworth, C.J., & Mantovani, M.S.M. 1994. The denudation history of the onshore continental margin of SE Brazil inferred from apatite fission track analysis. Journal of Geophysical Research, 99. p 18117-18145.

Gallagher, K. Hawkesworth, C.J., & Mantovani, M.S.M. 1995. Denudation, fission track analysis and the long term evolution of passive margin topography: application to the southeastern Brazilian margin. J. South American Earth Sciences, 8. p65-77

Kumar, A., Lal, N., Jain, A. K. and Sorkahbi, R. B., 1995, Late Cenozoic thermo-tectonic history of Higher Himalayan Crystalline (HHC) in Padar-Zanskar region, NW Himalaya: evidence from fission track ages. Journal of the Geological Society of India, 45, 375-391.

Lihou, J., Hurford, A. J. and Carter, A., 1995, Preliminary fission-track ages on zircons and apatites from the Sardona Unit, Glarus Alps, eastern Switzerland: late Miocene-Pliocene exhumation rates., Schweiz. Mineral. Petrogr. Mitt. 75, 177-186.

McHone, J. F. and Sorkhabi, R. B., 1994, Apatite fission-track age of Marquez dome impact structure, Texas. Lunar and Planetary Science XXV (NASA and Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, Texas), part 2, 881-882.

Sorkhabi, R. B., Jain, A. K., Nishimura, S., Itaya T, Lal, N., Manickavasagam, R. M. and Tagami, T., 1994, New age constraints on the cooling and unroofing history of the Transhimalayan Batholith (Kargil Area), N. W. India. Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Sciences (Earth and Planetary Science series), 103, 83-97.

Tippet, J. M. and Kamp, P. J. J., 1995, Quantitative relationships between uplift and relief parameters for the Southern Alps, New Zealand, as determined by fission track analysis., Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 20, 153-175.

Upton, D., Bristow, C. S. and Hurford, A. J., 1995, The denudational history of Western Thailand using apatite fission track analysis: implications for the tectonic models of S. E. Asia. Proceedings of the International Symposium: Geology of South East Asia and adjacent areas., Geological Society of Vietnam Journal of Geology, Series B, 5-6, 322.

(SURELY there must be more than these out there ...? Ed.)

 


Call for Contributions to the

May 1996 On Track issue 12

Dear Fellow Fission Tracker:

The next issue will be printed in May, 1996 and we are looking for contributions. We welcome contributions of virtually any kind, including descriptions of new lab techniques, reviews of useful products, news and gossip, raving editorials about what all the other labs are doing wrong (or right), corrections of errors that appeared in the previous issue, meeting announcements, job openings, cartoons, and descriptions of what you are doing in your research.

On Track always includes a list of Recent Fission-Track Papers. If you know of a paper that was published recently, or that is in press and should be published in the near future, please send it in. The Short Tracks: News section allows all of us to keep up with fission "trekking" around the globe. On Track also includes an International Fission-Track Directory in each May issue. If you are about to move, have moved, or know of someone who has moved, please inform me so the directory can be updated.

If you would like to contribute, send the final text and figures before the DEADLINE, 15 April, 1996. If it is a lengthy article, let me know the title and length as soon as possible. Please send a paper copy of your contribution and a 3.5 inch Macintosh&tm; compatible disc with the text saved in Microsoft Word. If you can't send a Macintosh compatible disc, send a 3.5 inch IBM compatible disc in Word, or WordPerfect. Contributions can also be sent electronically. Send all contributions for the next issue of On Track to:

Ruth Siddall , On Track Editor
Department of Geological Sciences
University College London
Gower St.
London WC1E-6BT, United Kingdom
Tel.: 0171-380-7777 office ext. 2758, lab ext. 2418
Fax: 0171-388-7614,
E-mail: r.siddall@ucl.ac.uk


L 1995 l

DIRECTORY OF THE INTERNATIONAL

FISSION-TRACK COMMUNITY

This directory is published solely for the information of fission-track researchers. It is neither a comprehensive directory including all fission-track researchers nor an official document endorsing the scientific stand of individuals by the fission-track community. We provide here an update to the initial directory prepared by Rasoul Sorkhabi with the hope that we have accounted for the changes in addresses that have occurred since the last release of the directory. If you have changed your address, know someone else who has or think that someone should be on this list, please let me know!

 

Andriessen, Paul A.M.
Laboratorium voor Isotopen Geologie, Faculteit der Aardwetenschappen Vrije Universiteit de Boelelaan 1085
1081 HV Amsterdam,
The Netherlands
Arne, Dennis C.
Ph.D. (Melbourne, 1990)
Department of Geology
University of Ballarat, P.O. Box 663
Ballarat, Victoria 3352, Australia
Tel.: 61-53-279-290,
Fax: 61-53-279-144
Email: DCA@fs3.ballarat.edu.au
Bal, K.D.
Ph.D. (Kurukshetra, 1982)
KDM Institute of Petroleum Exploration,
Oil & Natural Gas Corporation Ltd.
Dehradun , India
Baldwin, Suzanne
Department of Geosciences
University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ 85721,
United States of America
Balestrieri, Maria Laura
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra
via S. Maria, 53
56126 Pisa, Italy
Bergman, Steven C.
Ph.D. (Princeton, 1982)
ARCO Exploration and Production Technology
2300 W. Plano Parkway
Plano, TX 75075-8499,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-214-754-6264,
Fax: 1-214-754-6807
E-mail: dprscb@arco.com
Bigazzi, Giulio, Ph.D.
Instituto di Geochronologia e Geochimica Isotopica,
CNR, via Cardinale Maffi, 36
56127 Pisa, Italy
Tel.: +39-50-560430/560110, Fax: +39-50-589008
Blythe, Ann E.
Ph.D. (Cornell, 1992)
Department of Geological Sciences, University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93106,
United States of America
Tel. 1-805-893-4530
E-mail: blythe@magic.ucsb.edu
Boettcher, Stefan S.
M.S. (North Carolina, 1990)
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX 78712,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-512-471-8547,
Fax: 1-512-471-9425
E-mail: sboett@maestro.geo.utexas.edu
Bojar, Ana-Voica
Insitute für Geologie and Paläontologie
Karl-Franzens Universität
Heinrichstraße 26
A-8010 Graz, Austria
Fax: 43-316-382885
Brandon, Mark T.
Department of Geology and Geophysics,
Kline Geology Laboratory
P.O. Box 6666
Yale University
New Haven, CT 06511,
United States of America
Braun, Jean-Jacques
CREGU BP23
54501 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy
Cedex, France
Brix, Manfred R.
Ph.D. (Bonn, 1981)
Ruhr-Universität Bochmum,
Fakultat fur, Geowissenschaften
Institu fur Geologie
Postfach 102148
Universitätsstraße 150
D-W 4630 Bochum 1, Germany
Tel.: 0049-234-700-3236,
Fax: 0049-234-709-4179
Brown, Roderick W.
Ph.D. (La Trobe, 1992)
Department of Geology
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-479-1274,
Fax: 61-3-479-1272
E-mail: georwb@lure.latrobe.edu.au
Burchart, Jan
Institute of Geological Sciences
Polish Academy of Sciences
Zwirki i Wigury 93
02-089 Warsaw, Poland
Buck, Steve
Mobil North Sea Ltd.
Union Row
Aberdeen AB1 1SA, Scotland
Email: spbuck@abz.mobil.com
Carlson, William D.
Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles, 1980)
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX 78712,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-512-471-4770,
Fax: 1-512-471-9425
E-mail: wcarlson@ccwf.cc.utexas.edu
Carpena, Joelle
DSD-SCS-LGCA
C.E.N. Cadarache
13108 Saint Paul lez Durance CDX, France
Carpenter, Stephen B.
A505 Administration Bldg.
National Institute of Standards and Technology,
Gaithersburg, MD 20841,
United States of America
Carter, Andrew
Department of Geology
Birkbeck College
7-15 Gresse Street
London W1P 1PA, United Kingdom
Chambaudet, Alain
Universite de Franche-Comte
U.F.R. des Sciences et des Techniques,
Laboratoire de Microanalyses Nucleaires,
16 route de Gray
F-25030 Besancon Cedex, France
Coleman, Max
Postgraduate Research Institiue for Sedimentology,
The University of Reading,
PO Box 227, Whiteknights,
Reading, RG6 6AB,
United Kingdom
Cloos, Mark
Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles, 1981)
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX 78712,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-512-471-4170,
Fax: 1-512-471-9425
Email: cloos@maestro.geo.utexas.edu
Corrigan, Jeff D.
Ph.D. ( University of Texas at Austin, 1990)
ARCO Exploration and Production Technology
2300 W. Plano Parkway
Plano, TX 75075,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-214-509-4090
Email: dprjdc@arco.com
Coyle, David A.
Ph.D. (La Trobe)
Hirschstraße 8/1
D-7465 Geislingen, Germany
Tel.: +49-7433-6338
E-mail:
dcoyle@goanna.mpi-hd.mpg.de
Crowley, Kevin, D.
Ph.D. (Princeton University, 1982)
Associate Director
Board on Radioactive
Waste Management,
National Academy of Sciences
National Research Council
2001 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20007,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-202-334-3066,
Fax: 1-202-334-3077
Email: KCROWLEY@NAS.EDU
Danhara, Tohru
Kyoto Fission-Track Co.
Umezukita-machi 33
Ukyo-ku, Kyoto 615, Japan
Tel.: 81-75-881-2103,
Fax: 81-75-871-8044
De Corte, Frans
Institute for Nuclear Sciences
University of Gent
Proeftuinstraat 86
B-9000 Gent, Belgium
Decker, John E.
Ph.D. (Stanford, 1980)
ARCO Alaska, Inc.
ATO 1418, 700 G.St.,
Anchorage, AK 99501,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-907-265-1521,
Fax: 1-907-265-1515
Email: jdecker1@is.arco.com
De Wispelaere, Antoine
University Gent, Institute for Nuclear Sciences
Proeftuinstraat, 86
B-9000 Gent, Belgium
Tel.: +32-9-264-6627,
Fax: +32-9-264-6699
Email: dewispelaere@inwchem.rug.ac.be
de Wit, M.C.J.
American Research Laboratories (Pty) Limited
PO Box 106 Crown Mines 2025
Johannesburg, South Africa
Dodson, Martin H., Ph.D.
Department of Earth Sciences
University of Leeds
Leeds, LS2 9JT, United Kingdom
Dokka, Roy K.
Department of Geology
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA 70803,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-504-388-2975
Donelick, Raymond A.
Donelick Analytical, Incorporated
4819 Katy-Hockley Road
Katy, TX 77493
United States of America
Tel.: 1-713-371-3346,
Fax: 1-713-371-0133
Email: 72762.1465@compuserve.com
Duddy, Ian R.
Ph.D. (Melbourne, 1983)
Geotrack International,
P.O. Box 4120
Melbourne University
Victoria 3052, Australia
Tel.: +61-3-344-7214,
Fax: +61-3-347-5938
Dumitru, Trevor A.
Ph.D. (Melbourne, 1989)
Department of Geology,
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-2115,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-415-725-1328,
Fax: 1-415-725-2199
E-mail: trevor@pangea.stanford.edu
Duncan, Alasdair
BP Exploration
PG8G (2/4S W10)
301 St. Vincent Street
Glasgow, G2 5DD, Scotland,
United Kingdom
Dunkl, Istvan
Ph.D. (Budapest, 1991)
Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Laboratory for Geochemical Research, H-1112
Budapest, Budaorsi ut 45, Hungary
Tel.: +36-1-185-1781,
Fax: +36-1-185-1781
E-mail: h6580dun@ella.hu
Durrani, Saeed A.
Ph.D.; D.Sc. (Birmingham, 1978)
School of Physics and Space Research,
University of Birmingham,
Birmingham B15 2TT,
United Kingdom
Tel.: +44-21-414-4691/4655, Fax: +44-21-414-4693
Eby, G. Nelson
Ph.D. (Boston, 1971)
Department of Earth Sciences
University of Massachusetts
Lowell, MA 01854,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-508-934-3907,
Fax: 1-508-934-3003
E-mail: ebyn@woods.ulowell.edu
Evarts, Russ
U.S. Geological Survey
345 Middlefield Road
Mail Stop 999
Menlo Park, CA 94025,
United States of America
Fayon, Annia K.
M.S. (University of Texas, Dallas, 1989)
Department of Geology
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ 85287-1404,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-602-965-3971/5081,
Fax: 1-602-965-8102
E-mail: agakf@asuvm.inre.asu.edu
Fisher, David E.
Ph.D. (Florida, 1958)
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Miami
Miami, FL 33124-0401,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-305-284-3254,
Fax: 1-305-284-4258
Fitzgerald, Paul G.
Ph.D. (Melbourne, 1987)
Department of Geosciences
University of Arizona,
Tucson, AZ 85721,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-602-621-4052,
Fax: 1-602-621-2672
E-mail: kiwi@sapphire.geo.arizona.edu
Fleischer, Robert L.
Ph.D. (Harvard, 1956)
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences
West Hall, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Troy, NY 12180-3590,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-518-276-8523,
Fax: 1-518-276-8627
Foland, Sara S.
Amoco Production Company
1670 Broadway
P.O. Box 800
Denver, CO 80201,
United States of America
Foster, David A.
Ph.D. (SUNY, Albany, 1989)
VIEPS, Department of Geology
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-479-1516,
Fax: 61-3-479-1272
E-mail: dfoster@mojave.latrobe.edu.au
Fugenschuh, Bernhard
Ph.D. (ETH, Zurich, 1995)
Geologisches Institut
University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
Galbraith, Rex F.
Department of Statistical Science
University College, Gower Street
London, WC1E 6BT,
United Kingdom
Gallagher, Kerry.
Department of Geology
Imperial College,
Prince Consort Road,
London, SW7 2BT.
United Kingdom
Tel: 0171-594-6424
Fax: 0171-594-6464
e-mail: kerry@ic.ac.uk
Ganzawa, Yoshiro
Ph.D. (Hokkaido, 1983)
Hokkaido University of Education
1-2 Hachiman-cho
Hakodate, 040, Japan
Tel.: 81-0138-41-1121,
Fax: 81-0138-42-3982
Garver, John I.
Ph.D. (Washington, 1989)
Department of Geology
Union College
Schenectady, NY 12308,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-518-370-6517,
Fax: 1-518-370-6789
E-mail: garverj@gar.union.edu
George, Pete, Ph.D.
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX 78712,
United States of America
Gibson, Helen
M.Sc. (Melbourne, 1993)
Geotrack International
P.O. Box 4120
Melbourne University
Victoria 3052, Australia
Tel.: +61-3-344-7214,
Fax: +61-3-347-5938
Giegengack, Robert
Geology Department
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316,
United States of America
Giger, Matthias
Ph.D. (1991, Berne)
Dammweg 27
3604 Thun, Switzerland
Tel.: 0041-33-368-227
Gleadow, Andrew J. W.
Ph.D. (Melbourne, 1974)
Department of Geology
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-479-2649,
Fax: 61-3-479-1272
Green, Paul F.
Ph.D. (Birmingham)
Geotrack International
P.O. Box 4120
Melbourne University
Victoria 3052, Australia
Tel.: +61-3-344-7214,
Fax: +61-3-347-5938
Grist, Alexander
M.Sc. (Dalhousie, 1990)
Department of Earth Sciences
Dalhousie University
Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 3J5, Canada
Tel.: 1-902-494-2372,
Fax: 1-902-494-6889
Grivet, Manuel
Universite de Franche-Comte
U.F.R. des Sciences et des Techniques
Laboratoire de Microanalyses Nucleaires
16, route de Gray
F-25030 Besancon Cedex, France
Hadler, Julio C.
Depto. Raios Cosmicos e Cronologia
Inst de Fisica - UNICAMP, CP 6165
13081 Campinas, SP, Brazil
Hansen, Kirsten
Ph.D. (1986)
Geologisk Centralinstitut
Oster Volgrade 10, DK-1350
Kobenhavn K, Denmark
Tel.: 45-33-11-22-32 ext. 379, Fax: 45-33-11-46-37
Harrison, Mark T.
Department of Earth and Space Sciences
University of California,
Los Angeles
Los Angeles, CA 90024,
United States of America
Hasebe, Noriko
M.Sc. (Kyoto)
Department of Earth Sciences
Faculty of Science
Kanazawa University
Kanazawa 920-11, Japan
Tel.: 81-762-64-5727,
Fax: 81-762-64-5764
Email: hasebe@kenroku.ipc.kanazawa- u.ac.jp
Hashemi-Nezhad, S.R.
Ph.D. (Birmingham)
Department of Physics
Faculty of Science
Tabriz University
Tabriz, Iran
Hayashi, Masao
Kyushu Sangyo University
Fukuoka 813, Japan
Tel.: 092-673-5883,
Fax: 092-673-5899
Hegarty, Kerry A.
Ph.D. (Columbia, 1985)
Geotrack International
PO Box 4120
Melbourne University
Victoria 3052, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-344-7214,
Fax: 61-3-347-5938
Hejl, Ewald R.
Ph.D. (Max-Planck Institut)
Institut fur Geologie und Palaontologie der Universitat Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstraße 34/III
A-5020 Salzburg, Austria
Tel.: 0662-8044-5437/5400,
Fax: 0662-8044-5010
Hill, Kevin C.
Ph.D. (Melbourne, 1989)
VIEPS, Department of Geology
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-479-1273,
Fax: 61-3-479-1272
E-mail: geokch@lure.latrobe.edu.au
Honda, Teruyyki, Ph.D.
Atomic Energy Research Laboratory
Musashi Institute of Technology
Kawasaki 215, Japan
Hungerbuhler, Dominik
Department Erdwissenschaften
ETH-Zentrum
CH-8092, Zurich, Switzerland
Hurford, Anthony J., Ph.D.
Research School of Geological Sciences
University and Birbeck Colleges, Gower Street
London WC1E 6BT,
United Kingdom
Tel.: +41-71-380-7704 or
+44-71-387-7050 (Lab)
Fax: +44-71-388-7614
Issler, Dale R.
Ph.D. (Dalhousie, 1987)
Geological Survey of Canada
Institute of Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology
3303-33rd St., NW
Calgary, Alberta, T2L 2A7, Canada
Tel.: 1-403-292-7172,
Fax: 1-403-292-5377
Ito, Hisatoshi
M.Sc. (Kyoto, 1988)
Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry
1646 Abiko City, Chiba, Japan
Tel.: 81-471-82-1181,
Fax: 81-471-83-2962
Iwano, Hideki
Kyoto Fission-Track Co.
Umezukita-machi 33
Ukyo-ku, Kyoto 615, Japan
Tel.: 81-75-881-2103,
Fax: 81-75-871-8044
Johnson, Mark
U.S. Geological Survey
345 Middlefield Road
Mail Stop 999
Menlo Park, CA 94025,
United States of America
Jonckheere, R.
Laboratorium voor Aardkunde
Universiteit Gent
Krijgslaam 281
B-9000, Gent, Belgium
Kamp, Peter J., Ph.D.
Department of Earth Sciences
University of Waikato
Hamilton 2001, New Zealand
Tel.: 64-7-856-2889,
Fax: 64-7-856-0115
Kasuya, Masao
Kyoto Fission-Track Co.
Umezukita-machi 33
Ukyo-ku, Kyoto 615, Japan
Tel.: 81-75-881-2103,
Fax: 81-75-871-8044
Kelley, Shari A.
Department of Geological Sciences
Southern Methodist University
Dallas, TX 75275,
United States of America
Kendrick, Dan
M.S. (Utah State University)
VIEPS, Department of Geology
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-479-1273,
Fax: 61-3-479-1272
E-mail: geordk@lure.latrobe.edu.au
Ketcham, Richard
Ph.D. (University of Texas at Austin, 1995)
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX 78712,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-512-471-5763,
Fax: 1-512-471-9425
E-mail: richk@maestro.geo.utexas.edu
Kohn, Barry P.
Ph.D. (Victoria Univ. of Wellington, NZ, 1973)
VIEPS, Department of Geology
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-479-1516/1274,
Fax: 61-3-479-1272
E-mail: geobpk@lure.latrobe.edu.au
Koshimizu, Satoshi
Institute for Atomic Energy
Rikkyo University
Nagasaka 2-5-1, Yokosuka,
240-01, Japan
Tel.: 81-468-56-3131,
Fax: 81-468-56-7576
Kowallis, Bart Joseph
Ph.D. (Wisconsin, 1981)
Department of Geology
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-801-378-2467,
Fax: 1-801-378-2265
Krochmal, Michael
Autoscan Systems Pty. Ltd.
P.O. Box 112
Ormond, Victoria 3204, Australia
Lal, Nand
Ph.D. (Kurukshetra)
Department of Geophysics
Kurukshetra University
Kurukshetra-132119, India
Laslett, Geoff M., Ph.D.
CSIRO, Division of Mathematics and Statistics
Private Bag 10
Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia
Lewis, Cherry L.E.
Geotrack International (UK)
30 Upper High Street
Thames, OX9 3EX,
United Kingdom
Linn, Jon
M.S. (University of Kansas)
University of Kansas
Department of Geology
120 Lindley Hall
Lawrence, KS 66045,
United States of America
E-mail: jklinn@kuhub.cc.ukans.edu
Märk, E.
Hohrere technische Bundeslehr-
und Versuchsanstalt Anichstr.
26-28
A 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
Märk, T. D.
Abt. f. Kernphysik u. Gaselektronik
Institut f. Experimentalphysik
Leopold Franzens Universität
A 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
Marshallsea, Susan
Ph.D. (Melbourne, 1988)
Geotrack International
P.O. Box 4120
Melbourne University
Victoria 3052, Australia
Tel.: +61-3-344-7214,
Fax: +61-3-347-5938
Matsuda, Takaaki
Himeji Institute of Technology
2167, Shosha Himeji
Hyogo 671-22, Japan
Maze, Will B.
Ph.D. (1983, Princeton)
Exxon Production Research
P.O. Box 2189
Houston, TX 77252-2189,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-713-965-7223,
Fax: 1-713-965-7951
McCorkell, Robert
CANMET, Mineral Technology Branch
Energy, Mines and Resources
555 Booth Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G1, Canada
McCulloh, Thane H.
Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles, 1952)
7136 Aberdeen
Dallas, TX 75230,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-214-691-6809
Meyer, Arnaud J.
ELF AQUITAINE-CSTJF L1/010
64018 Pau Cedex, France
Miller, Donald S.
Ph.D. (Columbia)
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences
Rensselaer Polytechnic University
Troy, NY 12180-3590,
United States of America.
Tel.: 1-518-276-8523,
Fax: 1-518-276-8627
E-mail: don-miller@mts.rpi.edu
Miller, Elizabeth L.
Ph.D. (Rice, 1977)
Department of Geology, Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-2115,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-415-723-1149,
Fax: 1-415-725-2199
E-mail: miller@pangea.stanford.edu
Mitchell, Melinda M.
B.Sc. Hons. (La Trobe)
C/O Department of Geology
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-479-1274,
Fax: 61-3-479-1272
E-mail: geomm@lure.latrobe.edu.au
Moore, Marilyn
Ph.D. (Melbourne, 1982)
Geotrack International
P.O. Box 4120
Melbourne University
Victoria 3052, Australia
Tel.: +61-3-344-7214,
Fax: +61-3-347-5938
Mora, Jorge
Department of Geological Science
College of Science and Mathematics
Earth Sciences 351
State University of New York
Albany, NY 12222,
United States of America
Mora, Jorge
Escuela de Geologia
Minas y Geofisica
Facultad de Ingenieria
Universidad Central de Venezuela
Caracas, Venezuela
Murphy, John M.
M.S. (Alaska, 1989)
Department of Geology and Geophysics
University of Wyoming
Laramie, WY 82071,
United States of America
Tel.: 1- 307-766-5435
E-mail: geojm@plains.uwyo.edu
Naeser, Charles W.
Ph.D. (Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, 1967)
U.S. Geological Survey
Mail Stop 908
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr.
Reston, VA 22092,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-703-648-6964,
Fax: 1-703-648-6937
E-mail: cnaeser@gccmail.cr.usgs.gov
Naeser, Nancy D.
Ph.D. (Victoria Univ. Wellington, 1973)
U.S. Geological Survey
Mail Stop 908
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr.
Reston, VA 22092,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-703-648-5328,
Fax: 1-703-648-5310
Nishimura, Susumu, D.Sc.
Department of Geology and Mineralogy
Faculty of Science
Kyoto University
Kyoto 606, Japan
Tel.: 81-75-753-4150,
Fax: 81-75-753-4189
Noble, Wayne P.
B.Sc. Hons. (La Trobe)
C/O Department of Geology
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-479-2630,
Fax: 61-3-479-1272
E-mail: georwpn@lure.latrobe.edu.au
Oddone, Massimo
Dipartimento di Chimica Generale
viale Taramelli, 12
27100 Pavia, Italy
Olesch, Martin
Ph.D. (Wurzburg, 1986)
University Bremen
FB 5 Geowissenschaften
Postfach 330 440
2800 Bremen, 00071-00 Germany
Tel.: +49-421-2183940,
Fax: +49-421-2183993
Omar, Gomaa I.
Geology Department
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104,
United States of America
O'Sullivan, Andrea J.
B.Sc. Hons. (La Trobe, 1989)
VIEPS, Department of Geology
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-479-1274,
Fax: 61-3-479-1272
E-mail: geoajo@lure.latrobe.edu.au
O'Sullivan, Paul B.
Ph.D. (La Trobe, 1993)
Department of Geology
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-9479-3517,
Fax: 61-3-9479-1272;
E-mail: pos@mojave.latrobe.edu.au
Pagel, Maurice
Dr. es Sciences (Nancy, 1981)
CREGU, B.P. 23
54501 Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy, France
Tel.: 33-83-44-19-00,
Fax: 33-83-44-00-20
Pan , Yun
Department of Geological Sciences
University of SUNY at Albany
NY 12222, United States of America
Paul, Tracy A.
Ph.D. (Arizona State Univ., 1993)
Department of Chemistry
Arizona State University
Tempe,. AZ 85287-1404,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-602-921-1306
E-mail: agtxp@asuacad
Pengji, Zhai
Institute of High Energy Physics
Academia Sinica
P.O. Box 2732
Beijing 100080,
People's Republic of China
Perelygin, V. P. Dr.
Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions
Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna
Head Post Office, Box 79
101 000 Moscow
Russian Federation
Petford, N.
Bullard Lab.
Department of Earth Sciences
University of Cambridge
Madingly Rise
Cambridge, CB3 0DZ,
United Kingdom
Poupeau, Gerard R.
Doctor d'Etat (Paris, 1974)
Universite Joseph Fourier
Institut Dolomieu
15, Rue Maurice - Gignoux
38031 Grenoble Cedex, France
Tel.: 33-76-63-59-30,
Fax: 33-76-87-82-43
Price, P. Buford
Ph.D. (Virginia, 1958)
Department of Physics
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-510-642-4982,
Fax: 1-510-643-8497
E-mail: price@lbl.qov
Puch, Thomas
Insitute für Geologie and Paläontologie,
Karl-Franzens Universität
Heinrichstraße 26
A-8010 Graz, Austria
Fax: 43-316-382885
Qvale, Henning
(Oslo, 1978)
Institute for Energy Technology
P.O. Box 40
N 2007, Kjeller, Norway
Tel.: +47-63-80-61-22,
Fax: +47-63-81-55-53
E-mail: hq@varney.ite.no
Rahn, Meinert
Institut fuer Mineralogie, Petrologie und Geochemie
University of Freiburg
Albertstrasse 23b
79104 Freiburg, Germany
Tel: 49-761-2036416,
Fax: 49-761-2036407
Email:meinert@mis01.mineralogie .uni-freiburg.de
Ratschbacher, Lothar
Ph.D. (Graz, Austria)
Institut fur Geologie der
Universität Tubingen
D-7400 Tubingen, Germany
Tel.: +49-707-1295240,
Fax: +49-707-1296990
E-mail: epifr010mailserv.zdv.uni- tuebingen.de
Ravenhurst, Casey E.
Department of Geology and Geography
University of Massachusetts
Amherst MA 01003,
United States of America
E-mail: CRAVENHU@smith.smith.edu
Raza, Asaf
M.Sc. (Punjab, Pakistan)
C/O Department of Geology
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-479-1274,
Fax: 61-3-479-1272
E-mail: geoar@lure.latrobe.edu.au
Rebetez, Michel
Universite de Franche-Comte
U.F.R. des Sciences et des Techniques
Laboratoire de Microanalyses Nucleaires
16, route de Gray
F-25030 Besancon Cedex, France
Redfield, Thomas F.
Ph.D (Arizona State
University, 1994)
Technical Exploration Services
5 Frost Court
Mill Valley, CA 94941,
United States of America
Roden-Tice, Mary, K.
Ph.D. (Rensselaer, 1989)
Center for Earth & Environmental Science
SUNY Plattsburgh
Plattsburgh, NY 12901,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-518-564-2019,
Fax: 1-518-564-3152
Saini, Hari Singh
Department of Radiometric Dating
Birbal Sahni Institute of Paleobotany
53 University Road
Post Box 106
Lucknow 226 007, India
Sandhu, Amanjit S.
Ph.D. (Guru Nanak Univ., India)
Department of Physics
Guru Nanak University
Amritsar 143005, India
Seward, Diane
Ph.D. (Wellington, 1974)
Department Erdwissenschaften
ETH-Zentrum
CH-8092, Zurich, Switzerland
Tel.: 0041-1-252-2227,
Fax: 0041-1-252-7008
Email: diane@erdw.ethz.ch
Siddall, Ruth
Ph.D. (UCL, 1994)
Fission Track Research Group
Geological Sciences
University College London
Gower St
London WC1E-6BT, United Kingdom
Tel.: 0171-380-7777 ext. 2758 for office, ext. 2418 for lab
Fax: 0171-388-7614
E-mail: r.siddall@ucl.ac.uk
Singh, Gurinder
Ph.D (Guru Nanak Dev University, 1990)
Department of Physics
Guru Nank Dev University
Amritsar 143005, India
Sleadon, Andrew Jan
Ph.D. (Melbourne, 1974)
Department of Geology
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Tel.: 61-3-479-2649,
Fax: 61-3-479-1272
E-mail: seoajs@lure.latrobe.edu.au
Sobel, Ed
Ph.D. (Stanford, 1995)
Laboratoire de Geologie
CNRS Ura 10
5 rue Kessler
63038 Clermont-Ferrand cedex France
Fax: (33) 73 34 67 44
Email: sobel@opgcf5.univ- bpclermont.fr
Sohrabi, Mehdi, Ph.D.
Radiation Protection Department
Atomic Energy Organization of Iran
P.O. Box 14155-4494
Tehran, Iran
Sorkhabi, Rasoul B.
Ph.D. (Kyoto, Japan, 1991)
Department of Geology
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ 85287-1404,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-602-965-9852/5081,
Fax: 1-602-965-8102
E-mail: idrbs@asuvm.inre.asu.edu
Steckler, Michael S.
Ph.D. (Columbia, 1981)
Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory
Palisades, NY 10964,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-914-365-8479,
Fax: 1-914-365-0718
E-mail: steckler@lamont.idgo.columbia.edu
Steinmann, Michael
Department Erdwissenschaften
ETH-Zentrum
CH-8092, Zurich, Switzerland
Stiberg, Jan-Petter
Institute for Energy Technology
P.O. Box 40, N 2007
Kjeller, Norway
Tel.: +47-63-80-61-22,
Fax: +47-63-81-55-53
Stockmal, Glen S.
Ph.D. (Brown Univ., 1984)
Geological Survey of Canada
Institute of Sedimentography and Petroleum Geology
3303-33rd Street, N.W.
Calgary, Alberta T2L 2A7, Canada
Tel.: 1-403-292-7173,
Fax: 1-403-292-5377
Storzer, Dieter
Museum d'histoire naturelle
Laboratoire de Mineralogie
61 rue Buffon,
75005 Paris, France
Stump, Edmund
Ph.D. (Ohio State Univ., 1976)
Department of Geology
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ 85287-1404,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-602-965-3971/5081,
Fax: 1-602-965-8102
E-mail: ateds@asuacad.
Sumii, Tomoaki
M.Sc. (Kyoto)
Isotope Geoscience Section
Geochemistry Department
Geological Survey of Japan
1-1-3 Higashi,
Tsukuba, 305, Japan
Tel.: 81-298-54-3558,
Fax: 81-298-54-3533
Email: sumii@gsj.go.jp
Summerfield, Michael
Ph.D. (Oxford, 1978)
Department of Geography
School of Earth Sciences
University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh EH8 9XP, United Kingdom
Tel.: +44-31-650-2519
Suzuki, Masao
Rikkyo University
34-1 Nishi Ikebukuro
3-Chome, Toshima-ku
Tokyo 171, Japan
Tagami, Takahiro
Ph.D. (Kyoto)
Department of Geology and Mineralogy
Faculty of Science
Kyoto University
Kyoto 606, Japan
Tel.: 81-75-753-4153,
Fax: 81-75-753-4189
Talbot, James
1709 Overlook Drive,
Grapevine, TX 76051,
United States of America
Thomson, Stuart
Institut für Geologie
Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Universitätsstraße 150
P.O. Box 102148
Bochum 44721, Germany
Vance, Joseph, A.
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195,
United States of America
Van den haute, Peter
Geologisch Instituut
Rijiks Universiteit
B-9000 Gent, Belgium
Tel: +32-0-9-264/4592 or 6627,
Fax: +32-0-9-264-4984
E-mail: FTWORK@inwchem.rug.ac.be
Van der Wateren, F. M.
Institue for Earth Science,
Vrije Universiteit,
De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam,
The Netherlands
Vercoutere, Caroline
Geologisch Instituut
Rijiks Universiteit
B-9000 Gent, Belgium
Virk, H. S.
Department of Physics
Guru Nanak Dev University
Amritsar-143005, India
Wadatsumi, Kiyoshi
Department of Geosciences
Faculty of Science
Osaka City University
3-3-138 Sugimoto
Sumiyoshi-ku
Osaka 558, Japan
Wagner, Gunther A.
Ph.D. (Heidelberg, 1967)
Max-Planck-Institut fur Kernphysik
Saupfercheckweg, D-6900
Heidelberg, Germany
Wagner, Martin
Institut fur Petrographie und Geochimie,
Universität Karlsruhe
Kaiserstr. 12
D-7500 Karlsruhe, Germany
Walgenwitz, Frederic
ELF AQUITAINE-CSTJF L1/010
64018 Pau Cedex, France
Walker, J. D.
Ph.D. (Massachusetts Institute
of Technology, 1985)
Department of Geology
University of Kansas
120 Lindley Hall
Lawrence, KS 66045-2969,
United States of America
Walker, Robert M.
Ph.D. (Yale, 1954)
McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences
Campus Mail 1105
Washington University
1 Brookings Drive
St. Louis, MO 63130,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-314-935-6225,
Fax: 1-314-935-6219
E-mail: brw@wuphys.wustl.edu
Walter, Bob
Institute of Human Origins
1288 Ninth Street
Berkely, CA 94709-1211,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-510-525-0500,
Fax: 1-510-525-0668
Email: bwalter@iho.org
Waraich, R. S.
Ph.D. (Kurukshetra, 1978)
KDM Institute of Petroleum Exploration
Oil & Natural Gas Corporation LTD.
Dehradun, India
Watanabe, Koichiro
Department of Mining
Faculty of Engineering
Kyushu University,
36 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812, Japan
Tel.: 81-92-641-1101 ext. 5677
Weiland, Richard J.
M.A. (University of Texas at Austin, 1993)
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX 78712
United States of America
Tel.: 1-512-471-8547,
Fax: 1-512-471-9425
E-mail: rweiland@maestro.geo.utexas.edu
Westgate, John A., Ph.D.
Department of Geology
University of Toronto
Scarborough Campus
Scarborough, Ontario
M1C 1A4, Canada
Yamashita, Tohru
Kyoto Fission-Track Co.
Umezukita-machi 33
Ukyo-ku, Kyoto 615, Japan
Tel.: 81-75-881-2103,
Fax: 81-75-871-8044
Yegingil, Zehra
Cukurova University
Arts-Sciences Faculty
Physics Department
P.O. Box 171, 01330 Adana, Turkey
Zhao, Yunlong
Beijing Research Institute of
Uranium Geology
P.O. Box 764
Beijing 100029,
Peoples Republic of China
Zeitler, Peter K.
Ph.D. (Dartmouth, 1983)
Department of Earth &
Environmental Sciences
Lehigh University
31 Williams Drive
Bethlehem, PA 18015-3188,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-215-758-3671,
Fax: 1-215-758-3677
E-mail: pkz0@lehigh.edu
Zentilli, Marcos,
Ph.D. (Queen's Univ., Canada, 1974)
Department of Earth Sciences
Dalhousie University
Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 3J5, Canada
Tel.: 1-902-494-3873,
Fax: 1-902-494-6889
E-mail: zentilli@ac.dal.ca
Zimmerman, Robert Allen
Ph.D. (Pennsylvania, 1976)
U.S. Geological Survey, MS 905
Box 25046, Federal Center
Denver, CO 80225,
United States of America
Tel.: 1-303-236-5626,
Fax: 1-303-236-5603
Email:rzimm
@greenwood.ct.usgs.gov. internet
Zuffa, Gian G.
Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche
Universita di Bologna
via Zamboni 67
40137 Bologna, Italy
Tel.: 39-51354536; E-mail: zuffa@Dogon.geomin.unibo.it


FT STAge Systems

Automated microscope stage systems greatly increase operator productivity by automating tedious aspects of microscope work. Since their introduction in 1991, our systems have been adopted by more fission track laboratories than any other system.

Outstanding Hardware:

Our stage systems are based on a highly-reliable, high-precision Kinetek&tm; computer-automated microscope scanning stage. Several hundred Kinetek stages are currently in operation, mainly in the microelectronics industry. Compatible with almost any brand of microscope. Use of this popular, general purpose stage significantly reduces the system cost. System also includes a high-quality Calcomp&tm; 12x12" digitizing tablet. Assembly to full operational status generally requires only a few days.

Outstanding Software:

Software is a complete, highly sophisticated Apple Macintosh program developed with careful attention to all aspects of microscope work. Fully integrates dating, track length measurement, slide scanning, and file management functions. Moves precisely from grain to mica print in 3 seconds. Very user friendly. Fully functional even with the lowest cost Macintosh models and with the MS-Windows and MS-DOS compatible Macintoshes.

Innovative, Highly-Intuitive Stage Control System:

Stage is driven primarily with the digitizing tablet cursor rather than a joystick. For example, to center an object, just superimpose the cursor on it, push a button, and the stage automatically centers the object. This avoids tedious manual centering via the joystick. Most software commands are driven from the cursor buttons, which are easily distinguished by feel, so there is no need to look away from the eyepieces to the computer screen or keyboard.

Fission Track Laboratories Using the System:


*Stanford University, Stanford, California, installed in 1991
*University of California, Santa Barbara, California, installed in 1992
*ARCO Exploration and Production Technology, Plano, Texas, installed in 1992
*Universität Bremen, Bremen, Germany, installed in 1993
*E.T.H., Zürich, Switzerland, installed in 1993 using a preexisting stage (second system added in 1995)
*Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, installed in 1993
*University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, installed in 1993 (second system to be added in 1996)
*University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, installed in 1993
*Max-Planck-Institut, Heidelberg, Germany, installed in 1993 using a preexisting stage
*Union College, Schenectady, New York, installed in 1994
*Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, installed in 1994 using a new Zeiss stage
*La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, installed in 1994 using two new Zeiss stages
*University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, installed in 1995
*Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, installed in 1995
*Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela, installed in 1995
*Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, installed in 1995
*Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry, Chiba, Japan, installed in 1995

Detailed Information:

The system is described in a paper in Nuclear Tracks and Radiation Measurements, vol. 21, p. 575-580, Oct. 1993 (proceedings issue for the 1992 Workshop on Fission Track Thermochronology held in Philadelphia).

For Further Information Contact: Dr. Trevor Dumitru, 4100 Campana Drive, Palo Alto, California 94306, U.S.A., Telephone (auto-switching voice and fax line) 1-415-725-1328