Trademarks in the Industrial Age

Dramatic changes occured in the trademark laws in the United States. Companies whose names were already familiar to consumers rushed to file for Trademark Registration under the new act.

1904
2,524 Applications were filed for registration of trademarks.
1905
Trademark Act of February 20 gives meaning and strength to trademark protection by extending registration priveleges beyond those of the 1881 Act to include interstate commerce.
16,224 applications were filed for registration of trademarks. 415 of these are still in use today.
Some of these familiar names are:
Stetson® for hats and caps. First use in commerce was 1866.
Vaseline® for emollient. First use in commerce was 1870.
Pillsbury® for flour. First use in commerce was 1873.
Singer® for needles. First use in commerce was 1880.
Ladies' Home Journal® for a monthly magazine. First use in commerce was 1883.
Calumet® for baking powder. First use in commerce was 1889.
Colt® for pistols. First use in commerce was 1889.
Schlitz® for beer. First use in commerce was 1894.
Pepsi-Cola® for a tonic beverage. First use in commerce was 1896.
1914
"When it rains it pours"® and the Morton Umbrella Girl first used in commerce by Morton Salt Company.

McKinney Engineering Library