Trademarks in the Industrial Age

Dramatic changes occured in the trademark laws in the United States. Companies whose names were already familiar to consumers rushed to file for Trademark Registration under the new act.

1904
2,524 Applications were filed for registration of trademarks.
1905
Trademark Act of February 20 gives meaning and strength to trademark protection by extending registration priveleges beyond those of the 1881 Act to include interstate commerce.
16,224 applications were filed for registration of trademarks. 415 of these are still in use today.
Some of these familiar names are:
Stetson® for hats and caps. First use in commerce was 1866.
Vaseline® for emollient. First use in commerce was 1870.
Pillsbury® for flour. First use in commerce was 1873.
Singer® for needles. First use in commerce was 1880.
Ladies' Home Journal® for a monthly magazine. First use in commerce was 1883.
Calumet® for baking powder. First use in commerce was 1889.
Colt® for pistols. First use in commerce was 1889.
Schlitz® for beer. First use in commerce was 1894.
Pepsi-Cola® for a tonic beverage. First use in commerce was 1896.
1914
"When it rains it pours"® and the Morton Umbrella Girl first used in commerce by Morton Salt Company.


Celestial Trademarks

Around 1920 celestial motifs were popular for demonstrating both the elegance and strength of a product.

sphere with the words planet lite
March 22, 1921.
Electric-lighting fixtures.
  sun burst
July 28, 1914.
Medicinal remedies.
image of woman with the word tungsten
March 19, 1912.
Cigars.
circle with radiating lines
September 14, 1920.
Polish.
image of saturn
July 1, 1919.
Wheat flour.
sun and moon
December 21, 1920.
Garments.
  comet flying over mountains
March 1, 1921
Cigarettes.
star with the word Texact
July 1, 1919.
Asphalt products.
the word mars
January 3, 1911.
Pencils and chalk.
moon with stars and the word fascination
October 15, 1929.
Ladies' dresses.
the word comet with a stylized C
October 10, 1911.
Razors.
 
October 10, 1911.
Motion picture screens.

To learn more about trademarks, see The Official Gazette of the United States Patent and Trademark Office and Patent, Copyright & Trademark: Intellectual Property Law Dictionary by Stephen R. Elias.


Strange Trademarks

Styles of effective marketing design have changed throughout the century. Below are some interesting and unusual trademarks from early in the 20th century.

woman eating a small horse
January 10, 1911.
Remedy for coughs.
head with two faces
August 8, 1916.
Hair-tonic.
two cats one sad, one happy and includes the words anti katzen-jammer
March 26, 1912.
Headache remedy.
elf
July 14, 1914.
Raisins.
baby
March 15, 1921.
Children's rompers.
the word salamander with a stylized s
August 8, 1916.
Clothing.
person riding on a bug

September 23, 1913.
Insecticide.

To learn more about trademarks, see The Official Gazette of the United States Patent and Trademark Office or read The Story of the United States Patent and Trademark Office from the U.S. Department of Commerce.

This material may be duplicated providing appropriate credit is given.

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