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Susan Macicak,
Collection Development Officer

Merry Burlingham,
Chief Bibliographer

Carolyn Cunningham,
Collection Administration Librarian

Mary Rader,
Global Studies Coordinator

Dale Correa,
Middle Eastern Studies Librarian

Bonnie Brown Real,
Collection and Consortia Assessment Coordinator

Lexie Thompson Young,
UT System Licensing Coordinator

Emilie Algenio,
Consortia Resources Coordinator

Lisa Aguilar,
Library Specialist

Chemistry



I. Purpose:
To support teaching and research through the doctoral level in all areas of chemistry, including analytical chemistry, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, physical/theoretical chemistry, chemical physics, crystallography, as well as specialized chemical techniques such as spectroscopy. While interest in these areas is centered in the Department of Chemistry, faculty and students in related fields, such as biological sciences, chemical engineering, nutrition, materials science, physics and pharmacy also have special interest in one or more of these areas.

II. General Collection Guidelines:

A. Languages: English is the primary language of collection. Serials in the major European languages are acquired very selectively, and only when no translation is available. (According to Chemical Abstracts Service, over 80% of the world's journal literature in chemistry is published in English, and the vast majority of important chemistry journals worldwide publish articles exclusively or primarily in English.) Monographs in languages other than English are not actively selected.

B. Chronological Guidelines: Emphasis is on current research and development, but an effort is made to maintain strong retrospective collections in fields where past literature remains important, e.g. organic chemistry.

C. Geographical Guidelines: Not applicable.

D. Treatment of Subject: Emphasis is on research materials. Upper division and graduate level textbooks are acquired extensively, while lower division textbooks and popular works are acquired selectively. Biography and history of chemistry are acquired selectively, in cooperation with the History Bibliographer, and arelocated as appropriate. Publications of the major societies, e.g. American Chemical Society and the Royal Society of Chemistry are actively selected.

E. Formats of Material: The collection emphasizes monographs, peer-reviewed journals, trade periodicals, reference works, and data collections. Proceedings of conferences and symposia are also acquired. Microforms are acquired when appropriate. Electronic datasets, software, and AV material are acquired very selectively. Dissertations and theses from other institutions are not purchased.

F. Date of Publication: Retrospective materials are purchased very selectively.

G. Other General Considerations: Chemistry is central to most fields of scientific endeavor, and has a close relationship to certain areas of physics, biology, materials science, pharmacy, and engineering. Specific aspects of chemistry related to those fields are dealt with in those other statements. Interdisciplinary research in fields such as biotechnology, thermodynamics, superconductivity, spectroscopy, and biological chemistry do not fall neatly into one statement. Ongoing development of collections in these areas is also required through active cooperation among appropriate bibliographers.

III. Observations and Qualifications by Subject and LC Class:

Subject LC Class Location CDP [NCIP] Collecting Level Bibliographer
Chemistry (General) See Footnote 1 QD 1-9
Chemistry
Welch 2.132
C [3] Chemistry
History and Biography, General Works through 1800 QD 11-23
Chemistry
Welch 2.132
B [2] Chemistry
Alchemy, History & Biography through 1970 QD 23.3-31
Chemistry
Welch 2.132
A [1] Chemistry
Study & Teaching, including Popular & Recreational Works QD 33-49
Chemistry
Welch 2.132
B [2] Chemistry
Laboratories & Apparatus, including Techniques & Operations QD 51-63 Chemistry
Welch 2.132
C [3] Chemistry
Analytical Chemistry, See Footnote 2 QD 71-142 Chemistry
Welch 2.132
C [3] Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry, See Footnote 3 QD 146-196
Chemistry
Welch 2.132
C [3] Chemistry
Organic Chemistry, See Footnote 4 QD 241-441
Chemistry
Welch 2.132
C [3] Chemistry
Physical & theoretical chemistry, See Footnote 5 QD 450-731
Chemistry
Welch 2.132
C [3] Chemistry
Crystallography QD 901-999
Chemistry
Welch 2.132
C [3] Chemistry

Footnote 1
Includes encyclopedias, dictionaries, chemical literature & communication.

Footnote 2
Including qualitative & quantitative analysis, spectral analysis, electron diffraction, electrochemical, technical analysis of metal & other special materials, including electrolytes, glass, polymers, silicon organic composites, trace elements and water analysis.

Footnote 3
Including inorganic synthesis, general works and treatises on: metals with special emphasis on actinides, rare earth & transition metals, & on specific elements.

Footnote 4
Includes organic analysis, biochemistry, aliphatic compounds, carbohydrates, aromatic compounds, polymers, heterocyclic & organometallic compounds.

Footnote 5
Includes quantum and surface chemistry, electrochemistry, photochemistry.


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